Restoration of fecal continence after functional gluteoplasty: Long-term results, technical refinements, and donor-site morbidity

C. Scott Hultman, Michael R. Zenn, Tripti Agarwal, Christopher C. Baker, Harold I. Friedman, Wyndell H. Merritt, Kevin F. Hagan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: For patients with severe fecal incontinence, reconstruction of the anal sphincter, via gluteoplasty, may improve quality of life, but little is known about long-term functional results. We present our comprehensive experience with gluteoplasty, highlighting technical refinements, donor-site morbidity, and functional outcomes. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 25 consecutive patients (22 female, 3 male; mean age 42 years, range 23-65) undergoing gluteoplasty for fecal incontinence at a university teaching hospital from 1996-2004. Etiology of incontinence was as follows: obstetrical injury (n = 13), irritable bowel syndrome (n = 3), previous rectal surgery (n = 3), Crohn disease (n = 3), impalement (n = 1), rectocele (n = 1), and idiopathic (n = 1). Results: Gluteoplasty was successful in restoring fecal continence in 18 patients (72%) and was partially successful in 4 patients (16%). Two patients required permanent ostomy because of refractory incontinence. Donor-site morbidity and perirectal complications were observed in 16 patients (64%) and included dysthesias (n = 7), cellulitis (n = 5), irregular contour (n = 3), abscess (n = 2), seroma (n = 2), fistula (n = 1), but no hip dysfunction or altered gait. Mean length of follow-up was 20.6 months (range: 3-68 months). Conclusions: Despite a high incidence of donor-site and perirectal complications, unilateral functional gluteoplasty was successful in restoring long-term fecal continence in most patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)65-71
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of plastic surgery
Volume56
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Tissue Donors
Morbidity
Fecal Incontinence
Rectocele
Ostomy
Seroma
Cellulitis
Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Anal Canal
Gait
Teaching Hospitals
Crohn Disease
Abscess
Fistula
Hip
Quality of Life
Incidence
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Fecal incontinence
  • Gluteoplasty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Restoration of fecal continence after functional gluteoplasty : Long-term results, technical refinements, and donor-site morbidity. / Hultman, C. Scott; Zenn, Michael R.; Agarwal, Tripti; Baker, Christopher C.; Friedman, Harold I.; Merritt, Wyndell H.; Hagan, Kevin F.

In: Annals of plastic surgery, Vol. 56, No. 1, 01.01.2006, p. 65-71.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hultman, C. Scott ; Zenn, Michael R. ; Agarwal, Tripti ; Baker, Christopher C. ; Friedman, Harold I. ; Merritt, Wyndell H. ; Hagan, Kevin F. / Restoration of fecal continence after functional gluteoplasty : Long-term results, technical refinements, and donor-site morbidity. In: Annals of plastic surgery. 2006 ; Vol. 56, No. 1. pp. 65-71.
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