Response to ovarian stimulation in patients facing gonadotoxic therapy

Lauren N.C. Johnson, Katherine E. Dillon, Mary D. Sammel, Brenda L. Efymow, Monica A. Mainigi, Anuja Dokras, Clarisa R. Gracia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Chemotherapy naïve patients undergoing embryo/oocyte banking for fertility preservation (FP) were assessed for response to ovarian stimulation. Fifty FP patients facing gonadotoxic therapy were matched by age, race, cycle number, date of stimulation and fertilization method to patients undergoing IVF for infertility or oocyte donation. There were no differences in baseline FSH, anti-Müllerian hormone, antral follicle count and total gonadotrophin dose. FP patients had more immature oocytes (2.2 versus 1.1; P = 0.03) and lower fertilization rates per oocyte retrieved (52% versus 70%; P = 0.002). There were no differences in numbers of oocytes retrieved, mature oocytes or fertilized embryos. Subgroup analysis revealed that FP patients taking letrozole required higher gonadotrophin doses (3077 IU versus 2259 IU; P = 0.0477) and had more immature oocytes (3.4 versus 1.2; P = 0.03) than matched controls. There were no differences in gonadotrophin dose or oocyte immaturity among FP patients not taking letrozole. Overall, chemotherapy naïve FP patients had similar ovarian reserve, response to stimulation and oocyte and embryo yield compared to controls. Patients who received letrozole required higher gonadotrophin doses and produced more immature oocytes, suggesting that response to ovarian stimulation may be impaired in patients with hormone-sensitive cancers receiving letrozole. With improvement in cancer survival rates, there has been a shift in attention toward management of long-term consequences of cancer therapy, including infertility. Many young women with cancer, particularly those who will be treated with chemotherapy, pursue fertility preservation (FP) strategies for the purpose of banking oocytes or embryos for future use. We examined patients with no prior exposure to chemotherapy who underwent IVF to freeze embryos or oocytes for FP. Fifty FP patients were identified and matched to healthy controls by age, race, cycle number, date of stimulation and fertilization method. There were no differences in baseline measures of ovarian reserve or amount of medication needed to stimulate the ovaries. FP patients had more immature oocytes and lower fertilization rates than controls. There were no differences in number of oocytes retrieved, number of mature oocytes, rate of maturity or number of fertilized embryos. Subgroup analysis revealed that FP patients taking letrozole required higher gonadotrophin doses and had more immature oocytes compared with matched controls. There were no differences in gonadotrophin dose or oocyte immaturity among FP patients not taking letrozole. We demonstrated that FP patients not previously exposed to chemotherapy have similar ovarian reserve, response to stimulation and oocyte and embryo yield compared with infertile and donor controls. Patients who received letrozole required higher gonadotrophin doses and produced more immature oocytes, suggesting that response to ovarian stimulation may be impaired in patients with hormone-sensitive cancers receiving letrozole.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)337-344
Number of pages8
JournalReproductive biomedicine online
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • chemotherapy
  • embryo banking
  • fertility preservation
  • letrozole
  • oncofertility
  • oocyte banking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Developmental Biology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Response to ovarian stimulation in patients facing gonadotoxic therapy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this