Respiratory syncytial virus infection in Navajo and White Mountain Apache children.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The hospitalization rate for bronchiolitis of any cause among US children younger than 1 year is estimated at 31.2 per 1000. No data exist on respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-specific hospitalization rates among high-risk Native Americans other than Alaska Natives, for whom the incidence of RSV hospitalization was estimated at 150 per 1000 among infants younger than 1 year. We aimed to estimate RSV hospitalization rates among Navajo and White Mountain Apache children younger than 2 years. METHODS: We conducted prospective population-level hospital-based surveillance to determine RSV hospitalization rates among Navajo and White Mountain Apache children younger than 2 years. From 1997 to 2000, all children who were admitted for acute lower respiratory tract infection between October 1 and March 31 had a nasopharyngeal aspirate obtained and tested for RSV by commercial enzyme immunoassay kits. We reviewed charts of children who tested positive for RSV antigen to determine disease severity. RESULTS: During 3 RSV seasons (1997-2000), 51.3% of 1837 admissions for acute lower respiratory tract infection among children younger than 2 years were attributed to RSV infection. The overall seasonal RSV hospitalization rate among children younger than 2 years was 63.6 per 1000 and 91.3 per 1000 among children younger than 1 year. In a univariate analysis, predictors of severity included age <6 months (relative risk: 6.8; 95% confidence interval: 3.1-17.0). CONCLUSIONS: Navajo and White Mountain Apache children are at high risk for RSV disease requiring hospitalization. A lower threshold for hospitalization or underlying chronic conditions that predispose to severe RSV disease do not seem to explain high RSV hospitalization rates in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e20
JournalPediatrics
Volume110
Issue number2 Pt 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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