Resistin in Rodents and Humans

Hyeong Kyu Park, Rexford S. Ahima

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Obesity is characterized by excess accumulation of lipids in adipose tissue and other organs, and chronic inflammation associated with insulin resistance and an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases are major health concerns. Resistin was first discovered as an adipose-secreted hormone (adipokine) linked to obesity and insulin resistance in rodents. Adipocyte-derived resistin is increased in obese rodents and strongly related to insulin resistance. However, in contrast to rodents, resistin is expressed and secreted from macrophages in humans and is increased in inflammatory conditions. Some studies have also suggested an association between increased resistin levels and insulin resistance, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Genetic studies have provided additional evidence for a role of resistin in insulin resistance and inflammation. Resistin appears to mediate the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis by promoting endothelial dysfunction, vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, arterial inflammation, and formation of foam cells. Indeed, resistin is predictive of atherosclerosis and poor clinical outcomes in patients with coronary artery disease and ischemic stroke. There is also growing evidence that elevated resistin is associated with the development of heart failure. This review will focus on the biology of resistin in rodents and humans, and evidence linking resistin with type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)404-414
Number of pages11
JournalDiabetes and Metabolism Journal
Volume37
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adipocytes
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Diabetes mellitus, type 2
  • Inflammation
  • Insulin resistance
  • Macrophages
  • Obesity
  • Polymorphism, genetic
  • Resistin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

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