Resistance after single-dose nevirapine prophylaxis emerges in a high proportion of Malawian newborns

Susan H. Eshleman, Donald R. Hoover, Shu Chen, Sarah E. Hudelson, Laura A. Guay, Anthony Mwatha, Susan A. Fiscus, Francis Mmiro, Philippa Musoke, J. Brooks Jackson, Newton Kumwenda, Taha Taha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The administration of single-dose nevirapine to women in labor and their infants can prevent HIV-1 mother-to-child transmission. We examined nevirapine resistance in infants -who -were HIV-1 infected despite single-dose nevirapine prophylaxis, including 18 Ugandan infants (HIVNET 012 trial, nine subtype A and nine subtype D) and 23 Malawian infants (NVAZ trial, all subtype C). Nevirapine resistance was more frequent in infants with subtype C than with subtypes A and D (87 versus 50%, P = 0.016).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2167-2169
Number of pages3
JournalAIDS
Volume19
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Infectious Diseases

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