Research in a time of enteroids and organoids: how the human gut model has transformed the study of enteric bacterial pathogens

Sridevi Ranganathan, Emily M. Smith, Jennifer D. Foulke-Abel, Eileen M. Barry

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Enteric bacterial pathogens cause significant morbidity and mortality globally. Studies in tissue culture and animal models shaped our initial understanding of these host–pathogen interactions. However, intrinsic shortcomings in these models limit their application, especially in translational applications like drug screening and vaccine development. Human intestinal enteroid and organoid models overcome some limitations of existing models and advance the study of enteric pathogens. In this review, we detail the use of human enteroids and organoids to investigate the pathogenesis of invasive bacteria Shigella, Listeria, and Salmonella, and noninvasive bacteria pathogenic Escherichia coli, Clostridium difficile, and Vibrio cholerae. We highlight how these studies confirm previously identified mechanisms and, importantly, reveal novel ones. We also discuss the challenges for model advancement, including platform engineering to integrate environmental conditions, innate immune cells and the resident microbiome, and the potential for pre-clinical testing of recently developed antimicrobial drugs and vaccines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1795492
JournalGut Microbes
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 9 2020

Keywords

  • Human intestinal enteroids
  • bacterial pathogens
  • enteric bacteria
  • organoids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Gastroenterology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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