Representing whole objects: Temporal neurons learn to play their parts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Shape-selective neurons in inferotemporal cortex could carry information about either component parts or whole objects. A new paper now reports that whole-object shape selectivity is increased for stimuli that monkeys have learned to recognize in a discrimination task.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1105-1106
Number of pages2
JournalNature Neuroscience
Volume5
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2002

Fingerprint

Haplorhini
Neurons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Representing whole objects : Temporal neurons learn to play their parts. / Connor, Charles Edward.

In: Nature Neuroscience, Vol. 5, No. 11, 01.11.2002, p. 1105-1106.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{3dfae0287edd4d8e8347dbb1259acf7d,
title = "Representing whole objects: Temporal neurons learn to play their parts",
abstract = "Shape-selective neurons in inferotemporal cortex could carry information about either component parts or whole objects. A new paper now reports that whole-object shape selectivity is increased for stimuli that monkeys have learned to recognize in a discrimination task.",
author = "Connor, {Charles Edward}",
year = "2002",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/nn1102-1105",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5",
pages = "1105--1106",
journal = "Nature Neuroscience",
issn = "1097-6256",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Representing whole objects

T2 - Temporal neurons learn to play their parts

AU - Connor, Charles Edward

PY - 2002/11/1

Y1 - 2002/11/1

N2 - Shape-selective neurons in inferotemporal cortex could carry information about either component parts or whole objects. A new paper now reports that whole-object shape selectivity is increased for stimuli that monkeys have learned to recognize in a discrimination task.

AB - Shape-selective neurons in inferotemporal cortex could carry information about either component parts or whole objects. A new paper now reports that whole-object shape selectivity is increased for stimuli that monkeys have learned to recognize in a discrimination task.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036829633&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036829633&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/nn1102-1105

DO - 10.1038/nn1102-1105

M3 - Article

C2 - 12403999

AN - SCOPUS:0036829633

VL - 5

SP - 1105

EP - 1106

JO - Nature Neuroscience

JF - Nature Neuroscience

SN - 1097-6256

IS - 11

ER -