Repeated split-belt treadmill training improves poststroke step length asymmetry

Darcy S. Reisman, Heather McLean, Jennifer Keller, Kelly A. Danks, Amy J Bastian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background and objective. Previous studies suggest that error augmentation may be used as a strategy to achieve longer-term changes in gait deficits after stroke. The purpose of this study was to determine whether longer-term improvements in step length asymmetry could be achieved with repeated split-belt treadmill walking practice using an error augmentation strategy. Methods. 13 persons with chronic stroke (>6 months) participated in testing: (1) prior to 12 sessions of split-belt treadmill training, (2) after the training, and (3) in follow-up testing at 1 and 3 months. Step length asymmetry was the target of training, so belt speeds were set to augment step length asymmetry such that aftereffects resulted in reduced step length asymmetry during overground walking practice. Each individual was classified as a "responder" or "nonresponder" based on whether their reduction in step length asymmetry exceeded day-to-day variability. Results. For the group and for the responders (7 individuals), step length asymmetry improved from baseline to posttesting (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)460-468
Number of pages9
JournalNeurorehabilitation and Neural Repair
Volume27
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2013

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Walking
Stroke
Gait

Keywords

  • gait
  • motor learning
  • stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Rehabilitation
  • Neurology

Cite this

Repeated split-belt treadmill training improves poststroke step length asymmetry. / Reisman, Darcy S.; McLean, Heather; Keller, Jennifer; Danks, Kelly A.; Bastian, Amy J.

In: Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, Vol. 27, No. 5, 06.2013, p. 460-468.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Reisman, Darcy S. ; McLean, Heather ; Keller, Jennifer ; Danks, Kelly A. ; Bastian, Amy J. / Repeated split-belt treadmill training improves poststroke step length asymmetry. In: Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair. 2013 ; Vol. 27, No. 5. pp. 460-468.
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