Religious affiliation and contraceptive usage: changing American patterns, 1955-82

C. Goldscheider, William Mosher

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This paper presents national estimates of contraceptive usage patterns among white women from 1955 to 82 for the major religious populations in the United States. Drawing on several surveys, the data show that in 1955 differences in contraceptive use between white Protestants and Catholics were very large and corresponded to the higher fertility levels among Catholics. By 1982, all the major religious groups had experienced downward changes in expected family size and all used effective contraceptive methods. -Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationStudies in Family Planning
Pages48-57
Number of pages10
Volume19
Edition1
StatePublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

contraceptive use
denomination
contraceptive
fertility
religious group
family size
woman
method
family

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Demography

Cite this

Goldscheider, C., & Mosher, W. (1988). Religious affiliation and contraceptive usage: changing American patterns, 1955-82. In Studies in Family Planning (1 ed., Vol. 19, pp. 48-57)

Religious affiliation and contraceptive usage : changing American patterns, 1955-82. / Goldscheider, C.; Mosher, William.

Studies in Family Planning. Vol. 19 1. ed. 1988. p. 48-57.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Goldscheider, C & Mosher, W 1988, Religious affiliation and contraceptive usage: changing American patterns, 1955-82. in Studies in Family Planning. 1 edn, vol. 19, pp. 48-57.
Goldscheider C, Mosher W. Religious affiliation and contraceptive usage: changing American patterns, 1955-82. In Studies in Family Planning. 1 ed. Vol. 19. 1988. p. 48-57
Goldscheider, C. ; Mosher, William. / Religious affiliation and contraceptive usage : changing American patterns, 1955-82. Studies in Family Planning. Vol. 19 1. ed. 1988. pp. 48-57
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