Religiosity and HIV-Related Drug Risk Behavior: A Multidimensional Assessment of Individuals from Communities with High Rates of Drug Use

Veena G. Billioux, Susan Sherman, Carl A Latkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We examined the relationship between religiosity and HIV-related drug risk behavior among individuals from communities with high rates of drug use who participated in the SHIELD (Self-Help in Eliminating Life-Threatening Disease) study. This analysis examined the dimensions of religious ideation, religious participation, and religious support separately to further understand the relationship with risk taking. Results indicate that greater religious participation appeared to be the dimension most closely associated with drug behaviors. Specifically, we found that those with greater religious participation are significantly less likely to report recent opiates or cocaine use; injection drug use; crack use; and needle, cotton or cooker sharing. Future work to understand the nature of these associations will assist in the development of interventions in communities with high rates of drug use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)37-45
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Religion and Health
Volume53
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2014

Fingerprint

Risk-Taking
HIV
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Opiate Alkaloids
Cocaine
Needles
AIDS/HIV
Drugs
Religion
Religiosity
Injections
Participation

Keywords

  • Drug use
  • HIV
  • Injection drug user
  • Religion
  • Risk behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Religious studies
  • Medicine(all)
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "We examined the relationship between religiosity and HIV-related drug risk behavior among individuals from communities with high rates of drug use who participated in the SHIELD (Self-Help in Eliminating Life-Threatening Disease) study. This analysis examined the dimensions of religious ideation, religious participation, and religious support separately to further understand the relationship with risk taking. Results indicate that greater religious participation appeared to be the dimension most closely associated with drug behaviors. Specifically, we found that those with greater religious participation are significantly less likely to report recent opiates or cocaine use; injection drug use; crack use; and needle, cotton or cooker sharing. Future work to understand the nature of these associations will assist in the development of interventions in communities with high rates of drug use.",
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