Religion, clubs, and emergent social divides

Michael D. Makowsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Arguments regarding the existence of an American cultural divide are frequently placed in a religious context. This paper seeks to establish that, all politics aside, the American religious divide is real, that religious polarization is not a uniquely American phenomenon, and that religious divides can be understood as naturally emergent within the club theory of religion. Analysis of the survey data reveals a bimodal distribution of religious commitment in the U.S. International data reveals evidence of bimodal distributions in all twenty-nine surveyed countries. The club theory of religion, applied in an agent-based computational model, generates bimodal distributions of member commitment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)74-87
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Economic Behavior and Organization
Volume80
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Clubs
Polarization
Survey data
Agent-based
Computational model

Keywords

  • Agent-based model
  • Club theory
  • Culture divide
  • Religious divide
  • Sacrifice and stigma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Religion, clubs, and emergent social divides. / Makowsky, Michael D.

In: Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, Vol. 80, No. 1, 09.2011, p. 74-87.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Makowsky, Michael D. / Religion, clubs, and emergent social divides. In: Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization. 2011 ; Vol. 80, No. 1. pp. 74-87.
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