Religion and health in African Americans: The role of religious coping

Cheryl L. Holt, Eddie M. Clark, Katrina J. Debnam, David L Roth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: To test a model of the religion- health connection to determine whether religious coping plays a mediating role in health behaviors in a national sample of African Americans. Methods: Participants completed a telephone survey (N = 2370) assessing religious involvement, religious coping, health behaviors, and demographics. Results: Religious beliefs were associated with greater vegetable consumption, which may be due to the role of positive and negative religious coping. Negative religious coping played a role in the relationship between religious beliefs and alcohol consumption. There was no evidence of mediation for fruit consumption, alcohol use in the past 30 days, or smoking. Conclusions: Findings have implications for theory and health promotion activities for African Americans. Copyright (c) PNG Publications. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)190-199
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Behavior
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2014

Fingerprint

Religion
African Americans
coping
Health Behavior
Alcohol Drinking
Health
health behavior
health
alcohol consumption
Psychological Adaptation
Health Promotion
Telephone
Vegetables
Publications
Fruit
vegetables
Smoking
Demography
health promotion
mediation

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Health behaviors
  • Mediation
  • Religion
  • Religious coping

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Religion and health in African Americans : The role of religious coping. / Holt, Cheryl L.; Clark, Eddie M.; Debnam, Katrina J.; Roth, David L.

In: American Journal of Health Behavior, Vol. 38, No. 2, 03.2014, p. 190-199.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Holt, Cheryl L. ; Clark, Eddie M. ; Debnam, Katrina J. ; Roth, David L. / Religion and health in African Americans : The role of religious coping. In: American Journal of Health Behavior. 2014 ; Vol. 38, No. 2. pp. 190-199.
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