Reliable change in pediatric brain tumor: A preliminary investigation

Thomas A. Duda, M. Douglas Ris, Keith Owen Yeates, Ernest M Mahone, Jennifer S. Haut, Kimberly P. Raghubar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Children treated for brain tumor show evidence of declines in general intellectual abilities (i.e., IQ). Group-level data indicate subtle declines over time on average, but no study has utilized a clinical criterion to identify and describe a reliable change in survivors of pediatric brain tumor (PBT). In this study, we discuss the utility of reliable change index (RCI) methodology to supplement group-level analysis (e.g., repeated measures ANOVA). This pilot sample consisted of 22 children (M age = 10.47 years) treated for PBT who completed initial and follow-up assessments (M interval = 23.58 months). Cognitive data included composite scores from the WISC-IV. An RCI z-score was calculated for each participant on each composite score based on two different test–retest reliability coefficients. As a group, survivors of PBT did not demonstrate a statistically significant change from initial to follow-up on any WISC-IV composite score. When RCI was calculated based on reliability coefficients with shorter test–retest intervals provided by the test publisher, 77% of survivors demonstrated a reliable change in performance on at least one measure. The frequency of RCI decreases in working memory was significantly higher than expected. In contrast, only 32% of survivors showed reliable changes on at least one measure when RCI was based on a reliability coefficient derived from a clinical sample with a longer retest interval. This study demonstrates that highly divergent results may be obtained with RCI and the importance of the source of reliability estimates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalChild Neuropsychology
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Brain Neoplasms
Pediatrics
Aptitude
Short-Term Memory
Analysis of Variance

Keywords

  • brain tumor
  • intelligence
  • Pediatric
  • reliable change index
  • WISC

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Reliable change in pediatric brain tumor : A preliminary investigation. / Duda, Thomas A.; Ris, M. Douglas; Yeates, Keith Owen; Mahone, Ernest M; Haut, Jennifer S.; Raghubar, Kimberly P.

In: Child Neuropsychology, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Duda, Thomas A. ; Ris, M. Douglas ; Yeates, Keith Owen ; Mahone, Ernest M ; Haut, Jennifer S. ; Raghubar, Kimberly P. / Reliable change in pediatric brain tumor : A preliminary investigation. In: Child Neuropsychology. 2019.
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