Reliability of early cortical auditory gamma-band responses

Mackenzie Cervenka, Piotr J. Franaszczuk, Nathan E Crone, Bo Hong, Brian S Caffo, Paras Bhatt, Frederick Lenz, Dana Boatman-Reich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the test-retest reliability of event-related power changes in the 30-150. Hz gamma frequency range occurring in the first 150. ms after presentation of an auditory stimulus. Methods: Repeat intracranial electrocorticographic (ECoG) recordings were performed with 12 epilepsy patients, at ≥1-day intervals, using a passive odd-ball paradigm with steady-state tones. Time-frequency matching pursuit analysis was used to quantify changes in gamma-band power relative to pre-stimulus baseline. Test-retest reliability was estimated based on within-subject comparisons (paired t-test, McNemar's test) and correlations (Spearman rank correlations, intra-class correlations) across sessions, adjusting for within-session variability. Reliability estimates of gamma-band response robustness, spatial concordance, and reproducibility were compared with corresponding measurements from concurrent auditory evoked N1 responses. Results: All patients showed increases in gamma-band power, 50-120. ms post-stimulus onset, that were highly robust across recordings, comparable to the evoked N1 responses. Gamma-band responses occurred regardless of patients' performance on behavioral tests of auditory processing, medication changes, seizure focus, or duration of test-retest interval. Test-retest reproducibility was greatest for the timing of peak power changes in the high-gamma range (65-150. Hz). Reliability of low-gamma responses and evoked N1 responses improved at higher signal-to-noise levels. Conclusions: Early cortical auditory gamma-band responses are robust, spatially concordant, and reproducible over time. Significance: These test-retest ECoG results confirm the reliability of auditory gamma-band responses, supporting their utility as objective measures of cortical processing in clinical and research studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)70-82
Number of pages13
JournalClinical Neurophysiology
Volume124
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2013

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Reproducibility of Results
Matched-Pair Analysis
Auditory Evoked Potentials
Noise
Epilepsy
Seizures
Power (Psychology)
Research

Keywords

  • Auditory cortex
  • Auditory processing
  • Gamma-band
  • Reliability
  • Variability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Sensory Systems

Cite this

Reliability of early cortical auditory gamma-band responses. / Cervenka, Mackenzie; Franaszczuk, Piotr J.; Crone, Nathan E; Hong, Bo; Caffo, Brian S; Bhatt, Paras; Lenz, Frederick; Boatman-Reich, Dana.

In: Clinical Neurophysiology, Vol. 124, No. 1, 01.2013, p. 70-82.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cervenka, Mackenzie ; Franaszczuk, Piotr J. ; Crone, Nathan E ; Hong, Bo ; Caffo, Brian S ; Bhatt, Paras ; Lenz, Frederick ; Boatman-Reich, Dana. / Reliability of early cortical auditory gamma-band responses. In: Clinical Neurophysiology. 2013 ; Vol. 124, No. 1. pp. 70-82.
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