Reliability and validity of selected PROMIS measures in people with rheumatoid arthritis

Susan J. Bartlett, Ana-Maria Orbai, Trisha Duncan, Elaine DeLeon, Victoria Ruffing, Katherine Smith, Clifton Bingham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the reliability and validity of 11 PROMIS measures to assess symptoms and impacts identified as important by people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Consecutive patients (N = 177) in an observational study completed PROMIS computer adapted tests (CATs) and a short form (SF) assessing pain, fatigue, physical function, mood, sleep, and participation. We assessed test-test reliability and internal consistency using correlation and Cronbach's alpha. We assessed convergent validity by examining Pearson correlations between PROMIS measures and existing measures of similar domains and known groups validity by comparing scores across disease activity levels using ANOVA. Results: Participants were mostly female (82%) and white (83%) with mean (SD) age of 56 (13) years; 24% had ≤ high school, 29% had RA ≤ 5 years with 13% ≤ 2 years, and 22% were disabled. PROMIS Physical Function, Pain Interference and Fatigue instruments correlated moderately to strongly (rho's ≥ 0.68) with corresponding PROs. Test-retest reliability ranged from .725-.883, and Cronbach's alpha from .906-.991. A dose-response relationship with disease activity was evident in Physical Function with similar trends in other scales except Anger. Conclusions: These data provide preliminary evidence of reliability and construct validity of PROMIS CATs to assess RA symptoms and impacts, and feasibility of use in clinical care. PROMIS instruments captured the experiences of RA patients across the broad continuum of RA symptoms and function, especially at low disease activity levels. Future research is needed to evaluate performance in relevant subgroups, assess responsiveness and identify clinically meaningful changes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0138543
JournalPLoS One
Volume10
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 17 2015

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rheumatoid arthritis
Reproducibility of Results
Rheumatoid Arthritis
signs and symptoms (animals and humans)
testing
Fatigue of materials
Fatigue
pain
Pain
Analysis of variance (ANOVA)
high schools
Anger
observational studies
emotions
crossover interference
sleep
dose response
Observational Studies
Analysis of Variance
Sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Reliability and validity of selected PROMIS measures in people with rheumatoid arthritis. / Bartlett, Susan J.; Orbai, Ana-Maria; Duncan, Trisha; DeLeon, Elaine; Ruffing, Victoria; Smith, Katherine; Bingham, Clifton.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 10, No. 9, e0138543, 17.09.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bartlett, Susan J. ; Orbai, Ana-Maria ; Duncan, Trisha ; DeLeon, Elaine ; Ruffing, Victoria ; Smith, Katherine ; Bingham, Clifton. / Reliability and validity of selected PROMIS measures in people with rheumatoid arthritis. In: PLoS One. 2015 ; Vol. 10, No. 9.
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