Relatively normal repetition performance despite severe disruption of the left arcuate fasciculus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The arcuate fasciculus (AF) is believed to be fundamental to the neural circuitry behind many important cognitive processes. Connecting Wernicke's and Broca's area, these fibers are thought to be especially important for repetition. In this case study we present evidence from a patient that set doubt on these assumptions. We present structural imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and language data on a patient with a large left-sided stroke and severely damaged left AF who showed intact word repetition and relatively intact sentence repetition performance. Specifically, his sentence repetition is more fluent and grammatical, with less hesitation than spontaneous speech, and with rare omissions only during the longest sentences. These results challenge classical theories that maintain the left AF is the dominant language processing pathway or mechanism for repetition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)521-526
Number of pages6
JournalNeurocase
Volume18
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2012

Fingerprint

Language
Diffusion Tensor Imaging
Stroke
Disruption
Sentence Repetition
Imaging
Broca Area
Wernicke Area
Fundamental
Pathway
Hesitation
Omission
Wernicke's Area
Language Processing
Broca's Area
Spontaneous Speech
Word Repetition
Fiber
Dominant Language
Cognitive Processes

Keywords

  • Aphasia
  • Arcuate fasciculus
  • Case-study
  • DTI
  • Repetition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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title = "Relatively normal repetition performance despite severe disruption of the left arcuate fasciculus",
abstract = "The arcuate fasciculus (AF) is believed to be fundamental to the neural circuitry behind many important cognitive processes. Connecting Wernicke's and Broca's area, these fibers are thought to be especially important for repetition. In this case study we present evidence from a patient that set doubt on these assumptions. We present structural imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and language data on a patient with a large left-sided stroke and severely damaged left AF who showed intact word repetition and relatively intact sentence repetition performance. Specifically, his sentence repetition is more fluent and grammatical, with less hesitation than spontaneous speech, and with rare omissions only during the longest sentences. These results challenge classical theories that maintain the left AF is the dominant language processing pathway or mechanism for repetition.",
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AU - Tsapkini, Kyrana

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