RELATIVE EFFICACY OF BLOOD, URINE, RECTAL SWAB, BONE-MARROW, AND ROSE-SPOT CULTURES FOR RECOVERY OF SALMONELLA TYPHI IN TYPHOID FEVER

Robert H. Gilman, Miguel Terminel, Myron M. Levine, Pablo Hernandez-Mendoza, Richard B. Hornick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The recovery of Salmonella typhi from blood, rectal swab, urine, bone-marrow, and rose spots was compared in 62 patients with typhoid fever, most of whom had received some antibiotic therapy before presentation. S. typhi was isolated from culture of bone-marrow in 56 patients (90%); in contrast, S. typhi was recovered from blood in only 25 (40%), from stool in 23 (37%), and urine in 4 (7%). S. typhi was isolated from 24 (63%) of 38 patients who had rose-spot cultures. If culture sites had been limited to blood, stool, and urine, the bacteriological diagnosis would have been missed in 24 patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1211-1213
Number of pages3
JournalThe Lancet
Volume305
Issue number7918
DOIs
StatePublished - May 31 1975
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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