Relationships Between Neuroendocrine Differentiation and Sensitivity to γ-Radiation in Culture Line OH-1 of Human Small Cell Lung Carcinoma

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Abstract

After 16 months, an established line of human small cell lung cancer (OH-1) underwent a subtle morphological change which was associated with a virtually complete loss of neuroendocrine differentiation as judged by electron microscopy studies and a 12-fold loss in L-dopa decarboxylase activity. In nude (athymic) mouse heterotransplants, the histology of the early-passage cells (oat or lymphocyte-like) differed only slightly from the late-passage cells (intermediate or polygonal type); cytology studies showed no diagnostic differences between the passages. However, the early-passage endocrine-like cells showed up to 100-fold less cell survival after irradiation than the late-passage cells. Thus, subtle changes in the morphology of OH-1 cells are accompanied by a profound loss of neuroendocrine differentiation and the emergence of radiation resistance. These changes could have important parallelisms for behavior of small-cell lung carcinoma in humans. The cell culture model described may be useful in investigating the interrelationships occurring between endocrine and nonendo-crine cells in the spectrum of human lung cancer. The findings emphasize that neuroendocrine-related ultrastructure and biochemistry may help define important cell populations in lung cancer with respect to therapeutic sensitivity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1361-1367
Number of pages7
JournalCancer Research
Volume42
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 1 1982

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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