Relationships among cerebrospinal fluid human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) culture, quinolinic acid level, and reaction time in HIV-1-infected individuals

Robert L. Mapou, Wendy A. Law, Melvyn P. Heyes, Ronald Turnicky, Geoffrey Ling, Bruce Dopier, Alex Martin, Douglas Brown, Lydia R. Temoshok

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examined the relationships among cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) HIV-1 culture, quinolinic acid (QUIN) levels, and neurobehavioral functioning as measured by reaction time (RT) in HIV-1-infected (HIV+) individuals. Twenty HIV+ subjects completed lumbar puncture, neurological screening, magnetic resonance imaging scan, RT procedures, an estimated IQ measure, and self-reported mood state measures. Routine CSF laboratory studies, including white blood cell count (WBC), red blood cell count, protein, glucose, and percentage IgG were conducted. CSF was cultured for HIV-1 and assayed for QUIN. Subjects with positive HIV-1 CSF culture (CSF+) had significantly higher QUIN levels than subjects with negative HIV-I CSF culture (CSF-), although this difference was attenuated when WBC was controlled. Controlling for age and education, MANCOVA showed that CSF+ subjects had significantly slower RTs than CSF- subjects. Controlling for WBC did not change RT findings. Logistic regression indicated that both RT and QUIN contributed to the prediction of culture group. Group differences could not be explained by demographic factors, history, neurologic status, or medical status. Findings suggest a link among ability to culture HIV-1 from CSF, elevated QUIN, and slowed RT. This link, in turn, suggests a potential HIV-1-specific, biological marker associated with neurobehavioral change in HIV-1 disease. Findings may be related to subclinical brain inflammation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-49
Number of pages7
JournalNeuropsychiatry, Neuropsychology and Behavioral Neurology
Volume9
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Quinolinic Acid
Reaction Time
Cerebrospinal Fluid
HIV-1
Leukocyte Count
HIV
Erythrocyte Count
Aptitude
Spinal Puncture
Virus Diseases
Encephalitis
Nervous System
Immunoglobulin G
Biomarkers
Logistic Models
History
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Demography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Relationships among cerebrospinal fluid human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) culture, quinolinic acid level, and reaction time in HIV-1-infected individuals. / Mapou, Robert L.; Law, Wendy A.; Heyes, Melvyn P.; Turnicky, Ronald; Ling, Geoffrey; Dopier, Bruce; Martin, Alex; Brown, Douglas; Temoshok, Lydia R.

In: Neuropsychiatry, Neuropsychology and Behavioral Neurology, Vol. 9, No. 1, 01.01.1996, p. 43-49.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mapou, Robert L. ; Law, Wendy A. ; Heyes, Melvyn P. ; Turnicky, Ronald ; Ling, Geoffrey ; Dopier, Bruce ; Martin, Alex ; Brown, Douglas ; Temoshok, Lydia R. / Relationships among cerebrospinal fluid human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) culture, quinolinic acid level, and reaction time in HIV-1-infected individuals. In: Neuropsychiatry, Neuropsychology and Behavioral Neurology. 1996 ; Vol. 9, No. 1. pp. 43-49.
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