Relationship of dieting history to resting metabolic rate, body composition, eating behavior, and subsequent weight loss

Thomas A. Wadden, Susan Bartlett, Kathleen A. Letizia, Gary D. Foster, Albert J. Stunkard, Alicia Conill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examined the relationship of dieting history to resting metabolic rate, body composition, and subsequent weight loss in 50 obese women. A preliminary study showed that the women were able to report with satisfactory reliability the number of diets in which they had engaged (x̄ = 4.9 ± 0.5), as well as the total weight loss resulting from these diets (x̄ = 55.9 ± 6.0 kg). We found no evidence that weight cycling, as measured by either of these variables, was associated at baseline with a reduced resting metabolic rate or an increased percentage of body fat. Nor did we find that weight cycling was associated with smaller weight losses in a prospective trial in which subjects were treated by very-low-calorie diet and behavior therapy. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed, as are the methodological problems encountered in conducting research on this topic.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume56
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
StatePublished - Jul 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Basal Metabolism
dieting
resting metabolic rate
Feeding Behavior
Body Composition
weight cycling
eating habits
body composition
Weight Loss
weight loss
History
Reducing Diet
Diet Therapy
Weights and Measures
Caloric Restriction
history
Behavior Therapy
very low calorie diet
behavior modification
Adipose Tissue

Keywords

  • Dieting
  • Resting metabolic rate
  • Very-low-calorie diets
  • VLCDs
  • Weight cycling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Wadden, T. A., Bartlett, S., Letizia, K. A., Foster, G. D., Stunkard, A. J., & Conill, A. (1992). Relationship of dieting history to resting metabolic rate, body composition, eating behavior, and subsequent weight loss. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 56(SUPPL. 1).

Relationship of dieting history to resting metabolic rate, body composition, eating behavior, and subsequent weight loss. / Wadden, Thomas A.; Bartlett, Susan; Letizia, Kathleen A.; Foster, Gary D.; Stunkard, Albert J.; Conill, Alicia.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 56, No. SUPPL. 1, 07.1992.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wadden, TA, Bartlett, S, Letizia, KA, Foster, GD, Stunkard, AJ & Conill, A 1992, 'Relationship of dieting history to resting metabolic rate, body composition, eating behavior, and subsequent weight loss', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 56, no. SUPPL. 1.
Wadden, Thomas A. ; Bartlett, Susan ; Letizia, Kathleen A. ; Foster, Gary D. ; Stunkard, Albert J. ; Conill, Alicia. / Relationship of dieting history to resting metabolic rate, body composition, eating behavior, and subsequent weight loss. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1992 ; Vol. 56, No. SUPPL. 1.
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