Relationship of aortic valve calcification with coronary artery calcium severity: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

Khurram Nasir, Ronit Katz, Mouaz Al-Mallah, Junichiro Takasu, David M. Shavelle, Jeffery J. Carr, Richard Kronmal, Roger S Blumenthal, Kevin O'Brien, Matthew J. Budoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Aortic valve calcification (AVC) and atherosclerosis share causative and pathologic features. Objective: We evaluated the relationship between AVC and coronary artery calcium (CAC) severity in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Methods: Men and women aged 45-84 years (n = 6809; mean age, 62 years) were studied. The presence and burden of AVC and CAC were determined by noncontrast cardiac computed tomography. Relative risk regression was used to model the probability of AVC as a function of CAC > 0 as well as CAC categories (0, 1-99, 100-399, and ≥400) with the reference group being CAC = 0. Results: The prevalence of AVC and CAC was 13% and 50%, respectively. Among those without CAC, the prevalence of AVC was 5% and increased across levels of CAC severity such that 14%, 25%, and 38% had AVC with increasing CAC scores of 1-99, 100-399, and ≥400, respectively (P for trend <0.0001). After controlling for patient demographic factors and cardiovascular risk factors, the prevalence ratio of AVC among those with mild CAC (1-99) was 1.83 (95% CI, 1.45-2.31) and increased to 3.36 (95% CI, 2.56-4.42) for CAC ≥ 400. Similar statistically significant increased risk of AVC was found when CAC was assessed as a continuous variable. Conclusion: Our study shows that AVC is independently associated with increasing severity of CAC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-46
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2010

Fingerprint

Atherosclerosis
Coronary Vessels
Calcium
Calcification of Aortic Valve
Tomography
Demography

Keywords

  • Aortic valve calcification
  • Coronary artery calcification
  • Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Relationship of aortic valve calcification with coronary artery calcium severity : The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). / Nasir, Khurram; Katz, Ronit; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Takasu, Junichiro; Shavelle, David M.; Carr, Jeffery J.; Kronmal, Richard; Blumenthal, Roger S; O'Brien, Kevin; Budoff, Matthew J.

In: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Vol. 4, No. 1, 01.2010, p. 41-46.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nasir, Khurram ; Katz, Ronit ; Al-Mallah, Mouaz ; Takasu, Junichiro ; Shavelle, David M. ; Carr, Jeffery J. ; Kronmal, Richard ; Blumenthal, Roger S ; O'Brien, Kevin ; Budoff, Matthew J. / Relationship of aortic valve calcification with coronary artery calcium severity : The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). In: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. 2010 ; Vol. 4, No. 1. pp. 41-46.
@article{9001e57e74444926b2ca2978c639a5c3,
title = "Relationship of aortic valve calcification with coronary artery calcium severity: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)",
abstract = "Background: Aortic valve calcification (AVC) and atherosclerosis share causative and pathologic features. Objective: We evaluated the relationship between AVC and coronary artery calcium (CAC) severity in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Methods: Men and women aged 45-84 years (n = 6809; mean age, 62 years) were studied. The presence and burden of AVC and CAC were determined by noncontrast cardiac computed tomography. Relative risk regression was used to model the probability of AVC as a function of CAC > 0 as well as CAC categories (0, 1-99, 100-399, and ≥400) with the reference group being CAC = 0. Results: The prevalence of AVC and CAC was 13{\%} and 50{\%}, respectively. Among those without CAC, the prevalence of AVC was 5{\%} and increased across levels of CAC severity such that 14{\%}, 25{\%}, and 38{\%} had AVC with increasing CAC scores of 1-99, 100-399, and ≥400, respectively (P for trend <0.0001). After controlling for patient demographic factors and cardiovascular risk factors, the prevalence ratio of AVC among those with mild CAC (1-99) was 1.83 (95{\%} CI, 1.45-2.31) and increased to 3.36 (95{\%} CI, 2.56-4.42) for CAC ≥ 400. Similar statistically significant increased risk of AVC was found when CAC was assessed as a continuous variable. Conclusion: Our study shows that AVC is independently associated with increasing severity of CAC.",
keywords = "Aortic valve calcification, Coronary artery calcification, Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis",
author = "Khurram Nasir and Ronit Katz and Mouaz Al-Mallah and Junichiro Takasu and Shavelle, {David M.} and Carr, {Jeffery J.} and Richard Kronmal and Blumenthal, {Roger S} and Kevin O'Brien and Budoff, {Matthew J.}",
year = "2010",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jcct.2009.12.002",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "4",
pages = "41--46",
journal = "Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography",
issn = "1934-5925",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Relationship of aortic valve calcification with coronary artery calcium severity

T2 - The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

AU - Nasir, Khurram

AU - Katz, Ronit

AU - Al-Mallah, Mouaz

AU - Takasu, Junichiro

AU - Shavelle, David M.

AU - Carr, Jeffery J.

AU - Kronmal, Richard

AU - Blumenthal, Roger S

AU - O'Brien, Kevin

AU - Budoff, Matthew J.

PY - 2010/1

Y1 - 2010/1

N2 - Background: Aortic valve calcification (AVC) and atherosclerosis share causative and pathologic features. Objective: We evaluated the relationship between AVC and coronary artery calcium (CAC) severity in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Methods: Men and women aged 45-84 years (n = 6809; mean age, 62 years) were studied. The presence and burden of AVC and CAC were determined by noncontrast cardiac computed tomography. Relative risk regression was used to model the probability of AVC as a function of CAC > 0 as well as CAC categories (0, 1-99, 100-399, and ≥400) with the reference group being CAC = 0. Results: The prevalence of AVC and CAC was 13% and 50%, respectively. Among those without CAC, the prevalence of AVC was 5% and increased across levels of CAC severity such that 14%, 25%, and 38% had AVC with increasing CAC scores of 1-99, 100-399, and ≥400, respectively (P for trend <0.0001). After controlling for patient demographic factors and cardiovascular risk factors, the prevalence ratio of AVC among those with mild CAC (1-99) was 1.83 (95% CI, 1.45-2.31) and increased to 3.36 (95% CI, 2.56-4.42) for CAC ≥ 400. Similar statistically significant increased risk of AVC was found when CAC was assessed as a continuous variable. Conclusion: Our study shows that AVC is independently associated with increasing severity of CAC.

AB - Background: Aortic valve calcification (AVC) and atherosclerosis share causative and pathologic features. Objective: We evaluated the relationship between AVC and coronary artery calcium (CAC) severity in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Methods: Men and women aged 45-84 years (n = 6809; mean age, 62 years) were studied. The presence and burden of AVC and CAC were determined by noncontrast cardiac computed tomography. Relative risk regression was used to model the probability of AVC as a function of CAC > 0 as well as CAC categories (0, 1-99, 100-399, and ≥400) with the reference group being CAC = 0. Results: The prevalence of AVC and CAC was 13% and 50%, respectively. Among those without CAC, the prevalence of AVC was 5% and increased across levels of CAC severity such that 14%, 25%, and 38% had AVC with increasing CAC scores of 1-99, 100-399, and ≥400, respectively (P for trend <0.0001). After controlling for patient demographic factors and cardiovascular risk factors, the prevalence ratio of AVC among those with mild CAC (1-99) was 1.83 (95% CI, 1.45-2.31) and increased to 3.36 (95% CI, 2.56-4.42) for CAC ≥ 400. Similar statistically significant increased risk of AVC was found when CAC was assessed as a continuous variable. Conclusion: Our study shows that AVC is independently associated with increasing severity of CAC.

KW - Aortic valve calcification

KW - Coronary artery calcification

KW - Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=76349096736&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=76349096736&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jcct.2009.12.002

DO - 10.1016/j.jcct.2009.12.002

M3 - Article

C2 - 20159627

AN - SCOPUS:76349096736

VL - 4

SP - 41

EP - 46

JO - Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography

JF - Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography

SN - 1934-5925

IS - 1

ER -