Relationship of alcohol and illicit drug use with high blood pressure care and control among urban hypertensive Black men

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To examine the relationships among alcohol and illicit drug use and high blood pressure (HBP) care and control. Design: Baseline cross-sectional data from an ongoing clinical trial evaluating the effectiveness of a HBP care program was utilized. Methods: Data collected at baseline on 309 urban hypertensive Black men, aged 18-54, included: socio-demographics, health status, HBP care behaviors, alcohol and illicit drug use, urine screen for illicit drug use, and blood pressure (BP). Results: Men using alcohol and illicit drugs were less likely to report having medical insurance, having a doctor for HBP care, engaging in critical patient behaviors for HBP control, being on HBP medications, and compliance with HBP medication regimen. Alcohol and illicit drug users were more likely to eat high fat/high salt foods and significantly more likely to smoke cigarettes. In comparison to abstainers, men who used both alcohol and illicit drugs were significantly more likely to have uncontrolled BP and higher systolic blood pressure (SBP). Conclusions: Alcohol and illicit drug use were negatively associated with HBP care behaviors. Thus, BP was poorly controlled in this group of alcohol and illicit drug users. Screening, counseling, and treatment for alcohol and illicit drug use should be essential components in comprehensive HBP care. (Ethn Dis. 2000;10:175-183).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)175-183
Number of pages9
JournalEthnicity and Disease
Volume10
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 2000

Keywords

  • African-American
  • Alcohol Abuse
  • Drug Abuse
  • Health Care Behavior
  • High Blood Pressure
  • Hypertension
  • Males
  • Patient Behavior
  • Substance Abuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

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