Relationship between head-to-body delivery interval in shoulder dystocia and neonatal depression

Henry Lerner, Katherine Durlacher, Samuel Smith, Emily Hamilton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To evaluate the relationship between the head-to-body delivery interval in shoulder dystocia, persistent brachial plexus injury, and neonatal depression. We compared the head-to-body delivery intervals in 127 cases of uncomplicated shoulder dystocia—identified using medical record coding and verified by chart review in a university-affiliated community hospital—with a series of 55 medical-legal cases of shoulder dystocia with persistent brachial plexus injury, 14 of which included neonatal depression. Neonatal depression was defined as the presence of any of the following: fetal demise, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, intubation, umbilical artery pH lower than 7.00, or 5-minute Apgar score of 5 or lower. In the uncomplicated shoulder dystocia group, the median head-to-body delivery interval was 1.0 minute (interquartile range 0.5-1.0). The median for neonates with persistent brachial plexus injury and no depression was 2.0 minutes (interquartile range 1.0-4.0). For those with both persistent brachial plexus injury and neonatal depression, the median was significantly longer at 5.3 minutes (interquartile range 3.9-13.3), P<.001. Neonates born with persistent brachial plexus injury and neonatal depression after shoulder dystocia had longer head-to-body delivery intervals than those with uncomplicated shoulder dystocia or shoulder dystocia with persistent brachial plexus injury without depression. By 4 minutes, all of the neonates with uncomplicated shoulder dystocia were born. Conversely, the majority of neonates with depression—57%—had head-to-body delivery intervals greater than 4 minutes. Such information offers guidance to clinicians caught between the admonition to apply only gentle force when utilizing maneuvers to accomplish a shoulder dystocia delivery and the countervailing need to achieve delivery within a critical time frame to prevent hypoxic injury. III.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)318-322
Number of pages5
JournalObstetrics and gynecology
Volume118
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Dystocia
Arm Injuries
Brachial Plexus
Head
Umbilical Arteries
Fetal Death
Apgar Score
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Intubation
Clinical Coding
Medical Records

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Relationship between head-to-body delivery interval in shoulder dystocia and neonatal depression. / Lerner, Henry; Durlacher, Katherine; Smith, Samuel; Hamilton, Emily.

In: Obstetrics and gynecology, Vol. 118, No. 2, 01.01.2011, p. 318-322.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lerner, Henry ; Durlacher, Katherine ; Smith, Samuel ; Hamilton, Emily. / Relationship between head-to-body delivery interval in shoulder dystocia and neonatal depression. In: Obstetrics and gynecology. 2011 ; Vol. 118, No. 2. pp. 318-322.
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