Relationship between common carotid intima-media thickness and thoracic aortic calcification: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

Junichiro Takasu, Matthew J. Budoff, Ronit Katz, Juan J. Rivera, Kevin D. O'Brien, David M. Shavelle, Jeffrey L. Probstfield, Daniel O'Leary, Khurram Nasir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Mean maximum carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) is associated with both coronary artery disease and cerebral thromboembolism. Thoracic aortic calcification (TAC) detected by computed tomography (CT) is also highly associated with vascular disease and cardiovascular risk. No previous study has examined the relationship between CIMT and TAC in a large patient cohort. We performed a cross-sectional study to determine whether, at baseline, there is a relationship between CIMT and CT-determined TAC score. Methods: In the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, the study cohort included a population based sample of four ethnic groups (Chinese, White, Hispanic and African-American) of 6814 women and men ages 45-84 years. After exclusion of 198 persons due to incomplete information, we compared results of 6616 participants with both CIMT and TAC. TAC was measured from the lower edge of the pulmonary artery bifurcation to the cardiac apex. CIMT at the common carotid artery site was represented as the mean maximal CIMT of the right and left near and far walls, respectively. Multivariable relative risk regression analysis was used to evaluate relationships between TAC and CIMT. Results: The prevalence of TAC was 28% (n = 1846) and the mean maximum (+SD) CIMT was 0.87 ± 0.19 mm. A higher prevalence of TAC was noted across increasing CIMT quartiles (1st: 12%, 2nd: 21%, 3rd: 30%, 4th: 49%, p <0.0001). One standard deviation increase in CIMT was associated with a 16% higher likelihood for presence of TAC after adjusting for demographics and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors (95% CI: 1.12-1.26). In addition, individuals with CIMT in the highest quartile, as compared to those with CIMT in the first quartile, had a 76% higher likelihood for presence of TAC (prevalence ratio [PR]: 1.76, 95% CI: 1.37-2.26). In race-ethnic stratified analyses, similar associations were seen in all groups. Among those with TAC > 0, a higher CIMT was significantly associated with continuous TAC scores (log transformed) in the overall population as well as among all ethnic-racial groups. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that TAC is associated with increasing severity of carotid atherosclerotic burden as measured by CIMT. The combined utility of these two noninvasive measures of subclinical atherosclerosis for CVD risk assessment needs to be determined in future studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)142-146
Number of pages5
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume209
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2010

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Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Atherosclerosis
Thorax
Ethnic Groups
Tomography
Common Carotid Artery
Thromboembolism
Vascular Diseases
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Pulmonary Artery
Population
Coronary Artery Disease
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • Aortic calcification
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Cardiac CT
  • Carotid IMT
  • Ethnic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Relationship between common carotid intima-media thickness and thoracic aortic calcification : The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. / Takasu, Junichiro; Budoff, Matthew J.; Katz, Ronit; Rivera, Juan J.; O'Brien, Kevin D.; Shavelle, David M.; Probstfield, Jeffrey L.; O'Leary, Daniel; Nasir, Khurram.

In: Atherosclerosis, Vol. 209, No. 1, 03.2010, p. 142-146.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Takasu, J, Budoff, MJ, Katz, R, Rivera, JJ, O'Brien, KD, Shavelle, DM, Probstfield, JL, O'Leary, D & Nasir, K 2010, 'Relationship between common carotid intima-media thickness and thoracic aortic calcification: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis', Atherosclerosis, vol. 209, no. 1, pp. 142-146. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2009.09.013
Takasu, Junichiro ; Budoff, Matthew J. ; Katz, Ronit ; Rivera, Juan J. ; O'Brien, Kevin D. ; Shavelle, David M. ; Probstfield, Jeffrey L. ; O'Leary, Daniel ; Nasir, Khurram. / Relationship between common carotid intima-media thickness and thoracic aortic calcification : The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. In: Atherosclerosis. 2010 ; Vol. 209, No. 1. pp. 142-146.
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abstract = "Background: Mean maximum carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) is associated with both coronary artery disease and cerebral thromboembolism. Thoracic aortic calcification (TAC) detected by computed tomography (CT) is also highly associated with vascular disease and cardiovascular risk. No previous study has examined the relationship between CIMT and TAC in a large patient cohort. We performed a cross-sectional study to determine whether, at baseline, there is a relationship between CIMT and CT-determined TAC score. Methods: In the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, the study cohort included a population based sample of four ethnic groups (Chinese, White, Hispanic and African-American) of 6814 women and men ages 45-84 years. After exclusion of 198 persons due to incomplete information, we compared results of 6616 participants with both CIMT and TAC. TAC was measured from the lower edge of the pulmonary artery bifurcation to the cardiac apex. CIMT at the common carotid artery site was represented as the mean maximal CIMT of the right and left near and far walls, respectively. Multivariable relative risk regression analysis was used to evaluate relationships between TAC and CIMT. Results: The prevalence of TAC was 28{\%} (n = 1846) and the mean maximum (+SD) CIMT was 0.87 ± 0.19 mm. A higher prevalence of TAC was noted across increasing CIMT quartiles (1st: 12{\%}, 2nd: 21{\%}, 3rd: 30{\%}, 4th: 49{\%}, p <0.0001). One standard deviation increase in CIMT was associated with a 16{\%} higher likelihood for presence of TAC after adjusting for demographics and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors (95{\%} CI: 1.12-1.26). In addition, individuals with CIMT in the highest quartile, as compared to those with CIMT in the first quartile, had a 76{\%} higher likelihood for presence of TAC (prevalence ratio [PR]: 1.76, 95{\%} CI: 1.37-2.26). In race-ethnic stratified analyses, similar associations were seen in all groups. Among those with TAC > 0, a higher CIMT was significantly associated with continuous TAC scores (log transformed) in the overall population as well as among all ethnic-racial groups. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that TAC is associated with increasing severity of carotid atherosclerotic burden as measured by CIMT. The combined utility of these two noninvasive measures of subclinical atherosclerosis for CVD risk assessment needs to be determined in future studies.",
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T1 - Relationship between common carotid intima-media thickness and thoracic aortic calcification

T2 - The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

AU - Takasu, Junichiro

AU - Budoff, Matthew J.

AU - Katz, Ronit

AU - Rivera, Juan J.

AU - O'Brien, Kevin D.

AU - Shavelle, David M.

AU - Probstfield, Jeffrey L.

AU - O'Leary, Daniel

AU - Nasir, Khurram

PY - 2010/3

Y1 - 2010/3

N2 - Background: Mean maximum carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) is associated with both coronary artery disease and cerebral thromboembolism. Thoracic aortic calcification (TAC) detected by computed tomography (CT) is also highly associated with vascular disease and cardiovascular risk. No previous study has examined the relationship between CIMT and TAC in a large patient cohort. We performed a cross-sectional study to determine whether, at baseline, there is a relationship between CIMT and CT-determined TAC score. Methods: In the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, the study cohort included a population based sample of four ethnic groups (Chinese, White, Hispanic and African-American) of 6814 women and men ages 45-84 years. After exclusion of 198 persons due to incomplete information, we compared results of 6616 participants with both CIMT and TAC. TAC was measured from the lower edge of the pulmonary artery bifurcation to the cardiac apex. CIMT at the common carotid artery site was represented as the mean maximal CIMT of the right and left near and far walls, respectively. Multivariable relative risk regression analysis was used to evaluate relationships between TAC and CIMT. Results: The prevalence of TAC was 28% (n = 1846) and the mean maximum (+SD) CIMT was 0.87 ± 0.19 mm. A higher prevalence of TAC was noted across increasing CIMT quartiles (1st: 12%, 2nd: 21%, 3rd: 30%, 4th: 49%, p <0.0001). One standard deviation increase in CIMT was associated with a 16% higher likelihood for presence of TAC after adjusting for demographics and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors (95% CI: 1.12-1.26). In addition, individuals with CIMT in the highest quartile, as compared to those with CIMT in the first quartile, had a 76% higher likelihood for presence of TAC (prevalence ratio [PR]: 1.76, 95% CI: 1.37-2.26). In race-ethnic stratified analyses, similar associations were seen in all groups. Among those with TAC > 0, a higher CIMT was significantly associated with continuous TAC scores (log transformed) in the overall population as well as among all ethnic-racial groups. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that TAC is associated with increasing severity of carotid atherosclerotic burden as measured by CIMT. The combined utility of these two noninvasive measures of subclinical atherosclerosis for CVD risk assessment needs to be determined in future studies.

AB - Background: Mean maximum carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) is associated with both coronary artery disease and cerebral thromboembolism. Thoracic aortic calcification (TAC) detected by computed tomography (CT) is also highly associated with vascular disease and cardiovascular risk. No previous study has examined the relationship between CIMT and TAC in a large patient cohort. We performed a cross-sectional study to determine whether, at baseline, there is a relationship between CIMT and CT-determined TAC score. Methods: In the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, the study cohort included a population based sample of four ethnic groups (Chinese, White, Hispanic and African-American) of 6814 women and men ages 45-84 years. After exclusion of 198 persons due to incomplete information, we compared results of 6616 participants with both CIMT and TAC. TAC was measured from the lower edge of the pulmonary artery bifurcation to the cardiac apex. CIMT at the common carotid artery site was represented as the mean maximal CIMT of the right and left near and far walls, respectively. Multivariable relative risk regression analysis was used to evaluate relationships between TAC and CIMT. Results: The prevalence of TAC was 28% (n = 1846) and the mean maximum (+SD) CIMT was 0.87 ± 0.19 mm. A higher prevalence of TAC was noted across increasing CIMT quartiles (1st: 12%, 2nd: 21%, 3rd: 30%, 4th: 49%, p <0.0001). One standard deviation increase in CIMT was associated with a 16% higher likelihood for presence of TAC after adjusting for demographics and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors (95% CI: 1.12-1.26). In addition, individuals with CIMT in the highest quartile, as compared to those with CIMT in the first quartile, had a 76% higher likelihood for presence of TAC (prevalence ratio [PR]: 1.76, 95% CI: 1.37-2.26). In race-ethnic stratified analyses, similar associations were seen in all groups. Among those with TAC > 0, a higher CIMT was significantly associated with continuous TAC scores (log transformed) in the overall population as well as among all ethnic-racial groups. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that TAC is associated with increasing severity of carotid atherosclerotic burden as measured by CIMT. The combined utility of these two noninvasive measures of subclinical atherosclerosis for CVD risk assessment needs to be determined in future studies.

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KW - Atherosclerosis

KW - Cardiac CT

KW - Carotid IMT

KW - Ethnic

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