Relationship between body weight gain and significant knee, hip, and back pain in older Americans

Ross E. Andersen, Carlos J. Crespo, Susan J. Bartlett, Joan M. Bathon, Kevin R. Fontaine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To examine the association between BMI (kilograms per meter squared) and reports of significant knee, hip, and back pain using data from a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults 60 years or older. Research Methods and Procedures: Population-based survey data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, involving 5724 adults 60 years or older, were used. BMI, calculated from measured weight (kilograms) and height (meters squared), was used to categorize participants into six BMI-defined groups: underweight (

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1159-1162
Number of pages4
JournalObesity Research
Volume11
Issue number10
StatePublished - 2003

Keywords

  • BMI
  • Pain
  • Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Endocrinology
  • Food Science
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

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    Andersen, R. E., Crespo, C. J., Bartlett, S. J., Bathon, J. M., & Fontaine, K. R. (2003). Relationship between body weight gain and significant knee, hip, and back pain in older Americans. Obesity Research, 11(10), 1159-1162.