Relations between traumatic brain injury and the environment: Feedback reduces maladaptive behaviour exhibited by three persons with traumatic brain injury

Michael W. Schlund, Gary Pace

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Feedback is a commonly used technique in neurorehabilitation. It functions to strengthen or weaken select relations between individuals' behaviour and their environment. The study of behaviour-environment relations is a focus of operant psychology, commonly referred to as behaviour analysis. Central to behaviour analysis is the analysis of interrelations among stimuli, behaviour, and consequences. The focus on behaviour-environment relations may have considerable benefits for designing clinical treatments and accounting for successful and unsuccessful treatments, especially psychological interventions for maladaptive behaviour. In the present investigation, three persons with traumatic brain injuries, diagnosed with depressions and presenting mild cognitive impairments, received feedback about their maladaptive behaviour. Weekly feedback resulted in general reductions in the variability, and frequency of maladaptive behaviour. The results support the utility of giving equal consideration to relations between persons with traumatic brain inury and their environment, despite existing psychological or cognitive impairments. Future research on variables that influence the development and maintenance of behaviour-environment relations, and more generally operant behaviour, may provide a unique perspective on the effects of traumatic brain injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)889-897
Number of pages9
JournalBrain Injury
Volume13
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Neurology

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