Relation of uric acid to serum levels of high-sensitivity c-reactive protein, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and to hepatic steatosis

Tanya Keenan, Michael J. Blaha, Khurram Nasir, Michael G. Silverman, Rajesh Tota-Maharaj, Jose A.M. Carvalho, Raquel D. Conceição, Roger S. Blumenthal, Raul D. Santos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Increased uric acid (UA) is strongly linked to cardiovascular disease. However, the independent role of UA is still debated because it is associated with several cardiovascular risk factors including obesity and metabolic syndrome. This study assessed the association of UA with increased high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), increased ratio of triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TG/HDL), sonographically detected hepatic steatosis, and their clustering in the presence and absence of obesity and metabolic syndrome. We evaluated 3,518 employed subjects without clinical cardiovascular disease from November 2008 through July 2010. Prevalence of hs-CRP <3 mg/L was 19%, that of TG/HDL <3 was 44%, and that of hepatic steatosis was 43%. In multivariable logistic regression after adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors and confounders, highest versus lowest UA quartile was associated with hs-CRP <3 mg/L (odds ratio [OR] 1.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01 to 2.28, p = 0.04), TG/HDL <3 (OR 3.29, 95% CI 2.36 to 4.60, p <0.001), and hepatic steatosis (OR 3.10, 95% CI 2.22 to 4.32, p <0.001) independently of obesity and metabolic syndrome. Association of UA with hs-CRP <3 mg/L became nonsignificant in analyses stratified by obesity. Ascending UA quartiles compared to the lowest UA quartile demonstrated a graded increase in the odds of having 2 or 3 of these risk conditions and a successive decrease in the odds of having none. In conclusion, high UA levels were associated with increased TG/HDL and hepatic steatosis independently of metabolic syndrome and obesity and with increased hs-CRP independently of metabolic syndrome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1787-1792
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume110
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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