Relation of Lifestyle Factors and Life's Simple 7 Score to Temporal Reduction in Troponin Levels Measured by a High-Sensitivity Assay (from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study)

Anna Fretz, John W. McEvoy, Casey Rebholz, Chiadi Ericson Ndumele, Roberta Florido, Ron C. Hoogeveen, Christie M. Ballantyne, Elizabeth Selvin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The impact of lifestyle-related factors on temporal decreases in high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT), possibly reflecting reversal of subclinical myocardial damage, has not been evaluated in a community-based setting. We measured hs-cTnT twice, 6 years apart, in 9,256 participants from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study who were free from baseline cardiovascular disease. We used Poisson and multinomial regression to evaluate the associations of cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, body mass index, healthy diet score, physical activity, and Life's Simple 7 (LS7) score (a composite measure of lifestyle-related health factors) with 6-year decreases in hs-cTnT. Of the 3,017 patients with detectable baseline hs-cTnT (≥5 ng/L), 2,418 (80%) remained detectable, whereas 599 (20%) had undetectable levels (<5 ng/L) at the 6-year follow-up visit. Patients with a body mass index of <30 kg/m2, adherence to American Heart Association's physical activity guidelines, and average or optimal LS7 scores were more likely to improve from a detectable to an undetectable hs-cTnT level during follow-up. There was a robust association between optimal LS7 score and temporal hs-cTnT reduction (relative risk 1.64, 95% confidence interval 1.11 to 2.42, for baseline ≥5 ng/L and for follow-up <5 ng/L). A greater duration of exposure to average or optimal LS7 score was also associated with increased likelihood of temporal hs-cTnT reduction (p-trend <0.001). In conclusion, we found that lifestyle factors and the LS7 score were associated with reversal of subclinical myocardial damage. In conclusion, our results support the growing evidence that hs-cTnT levels change in response to lifestyle modifications and hs-cTnT may serve as a useful dynamic surrogate for monitoring cardiovascular risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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