Regulation of intestinal serotonin transporter expression via epigenetic mechanisms: Role of HDAC2

Ravinder K. Gill, Anoop Kumar, Pooja Malhotra, Daniel Maher, Varsha Singh, Pradeep K. Dudeja, Waddah Alrefai, Seema Saksena

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) facilitates clearance of extracellular 5-HT by its uptake and internalization. Decreased expression of SERT and consequent high 5-HT levels have been implicated in various diarrheal disorders. Thus, appropriate regulation of SERT is critical for maintenance of 5-HT homeostasis in health and disease. Previous studies demonstrated that SERT is regulated via posttranslational and transcriptional mechanisms. However, the role of epigenetic mechanisms in SERT regulation is not known. Current studies investigated the effects of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition on SERT expression and delineated the mechanisms. Treatment of Caco-2 cells with the pan-HDAC inhibitors butyrate (5 mM) and trichostatin (TSA, 1 μM) decreased SERT mRNA and protein levels. Butyrate- or TSA-induced decrease in SERT was associated with decreased activity of human SERT (hSERT) promoter 1 (upstream of exon 1a), but not hSERT promoter 2 (upstream of exon 2). Butyrate + TSA did not show an additive effect on SERT expression, indicating that mechanisms involving histone hyperacetylation may be involved. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated enrichment of the hSERT promoter 1 (flanking nt -250/+2) with tetra-acetylated histone H3 or H4, which was increased (~3-fold) by butyrate. Interestingly, specific inhibition of HDAC2 (but not HDAC1) utilizing small interfering RNA decreased SERT mRNA and protein levels. The decrease in SERT expression by HDAC inhibition was recapitulated in an in vivo model. SERT mRNA levels were decreased in the ileum and colon of mice fed pectin (increased availability of butyrate) compared with controls fed a fiber-free diet (~50-60%). Our results identify a novel role of HDAC2 as a regulator of SERT gene expression in intestinal epithelial cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Cell Physiology
Volume304
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 15 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins
Butyrates
Epigenomics
Serotonin
Histones
Histone Deacetylases
Messenger RNA
Exons
Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors
Caco-2 Cells
Chromatin Immunoprecipitation
Regulator Genes
Ileum
Human Activities
Small Interfering RNA
Colon
Homeostasis
Epithelial Cells
Maintenance
Diet

Keywords

  • Butyrate epigenetics
  • Histone deacetylase inhibition
  • SERT
  • Trichostatin A

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Physiology

Cite this

Regulation of intestinal serotonin transporter expression via epigenetic mechanisms : Role of HDAC2. / Gill, Ravinder K.; Kumar, Anoop; Malhotra, Pooja; Maher, Daniel; Singh, Varsha; Dudeja, Pradeep K.; Alrefai, Waddah; Saksena, Seema.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Cell Physiology, Vol. 304, No. 4, 15.02.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gill, Ravinder K. ; Kumar, Anoop ; Malhotra, Pooja ; Maher, Daniel ; Singh, Varsha ; Dudeja, Pradeep K. ; Alrefai, Waddah ; Saksena, Seema. / Regulation of intestinal serotonin transporter expression via epigenetic mechanisms : Role of HDAC2. In: American Journal of Physiology - Cell Physiology. 2013 ; Vol. 304, No. 4.
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