Regulating the high: Cognitive and neural processes underlying positive emotion regulation in bipolar I disorder

Jiyoung Park, Özlem Ayduk, O’Donnell Lisa, Jinsoo Chun, June Gruber, Masoud Kamali, Melvin G. McInnis, Patricia Deldin, Ethan Kross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although it is well established that bipolar I disorder (BD) is characterized by excessive positive emotionality, the cognitive and neural processes that underlie such responses are unclear. We addressed this issue by examining the role that an emotion regulatory process called self-distancing plays in two potentially different BD phenotypes—BD with versus without a history of psychosis—and healthy individuals. Participants reflected on a positive autobiographical memory and then rated their level of spontaneous self-distancing. Neurophysiological activity was continuously monitored using electroencephalogram. As predicted, participants with BD who have a history of psychosis spontaneously selfdistanced less and displayed stronger neurophysiological signs of positive emotional reactivity compared with the other two groups. These findings shed light on the cognitive and neural mechanisms underlying excessive positive emotionality in BD. They also suggest that individuals with BD who have a history of psychosis may represent a distinct clinical phenotype characterized by dysfunctional emotion regulation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)661-674
Number of pages14
JournalClinical Psychological Science
Volume2
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bipolar Disorder
Emotions
Psychotic Disorders
Episodic Memory
Electroencephalography
Phenotype

Keywords

  • Bipolar disorder
  • Emotion regulation
  • Psychosis history
  • Self-distancing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Regulating the high : Cognitive and neural processes underlying positive emotion regulation in bipolar I disorder. / Park, Jiyoung; Ayduk, Özlem; Lisa, O’Donnell; Chun, Jinsoo; Gruber, June; Kamali, Masoud; McInnis, Melvin G.; Deldin, Patricia; Kross, Ethan.

In: Clinical Psychological Science, Vol. 2, No. 6, 01.01.2014, p. 661-674.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Park, J, Ayduk, Ö, Lisa, OD, Chun, J, Gruber, J, Kamali, M, McInnis, MG, Deldin, P & Kross, E 2014, 'Regulating the high: Cognitive and neural processes underlying positive emotion regulation in bipolar I disorder', Clinical Psychological Science, vol. 2, no. 6, pp. 661-674. https://doi.org/10.1177/2167702614527580
Park, Jiyoung ; Ayduk, Özlem ; Lisa, O’Donnell ; Chun, Jinsoo ; Gruber, June ; Kamali, Masoud ; McInnis, Melvin G. ; Deldin, Patricia ; Kross, Ethan. / Regulating the high : Cognitive and neural processes underlying positive emotion regulation in bipolar I disorder. In: Clinical Psychological Science. 2014 ; Vol. 2, No. 6. pp. 661-674.
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