Regression of established tumors in mice mediated by the oral administration of a recombinant Listeria monocytogenes vaccine

Z. K. Pan, G. Ikonomidis, D. Pardoll, Andrew Mark Pardoll

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We have shown previously that Listeria monocytogenes, a gram-positive, facultative intracellular bacterium, is a potent vector for targeting tumor- specific antigens to the immune system. After parenteral administration, we observed protection against both renal and colorectal mouse tumors and regression of established renal tumors. In the present study, we have exploited the fact that the normal route of infection of this organism is through the gut. We show that an L. monocytogenes recombinant that expresses a model tumor antigen is an effective cancer immunotherapeutic agent when delivered orally in that it causes regression of established, macroscopic mouse renal and colorectal tumors expressing the same antigen.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4776-4779
Number of pages4
JournalCancer Research
Volume55
Issue number21
StatePublished - 1995

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Listeria monocytogenes
Oral Administration
Vaccines
Neoplasm Antigens
Kidney
Colorectal Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Immune System
Bacteria
Antigens
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Regression of established tumors in mice mediated by the oral administration of a recombinant Listeria monocytogenes vaccine. / Pan, Z. K.; Ikonomidis, G.; Pardoll, D.; Pardoll, Andrew Mark.

In: Cancer Research, Vol. 55, No. 21, 1995, p. 4776-4779.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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