Regionally Specific Regulation of Sensorimotor Network Connectivity Following Tactile Improvement

Stefanie Heba, Melanie Lenz, Tobias Kalisch, Oliver Höffken, Lauren M. Schweizer, Benjamin Glaubitz, Nicolaas Puts, Martin Tegenthoff, Hubert R. Dinse, Tobias Schmidt-Wilcke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Correlations between inherent, task-free low-frequency fluctuations in the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals of the brain provide a potent tool to delineate its functional architecture in terms of intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC). Still, it remains unclear how iFC is modulated during learning. We employed whole-brain resting-state magnetic resonance imaging prior to and after training-independent repetitive sensory stimulation (rSS), which is known to induce somatosensory cortical reorganization. We investigated which areas in the sensorimotor network are susceptible to neural plasticity (i.e., where changes in functional connectivity occurred) and where iFC might be indicative of enhanced tactile performance. We hypothesized iFC to increase in those brain regions primarily receiving the afferent tactile input. Strengthened intrinsic connectivity within the sensorimotor network after rSS was found not only in the postcentral gyrus contralateral to the stimulated hand, but also in associative brain regions, where iFC correlated positively with tactile performance or learning. We also observed that rSS led to attenuation of the network at higher cortical levels, which possibly promotes facilitation of tactile discrimination. We found that resting-state BOLD fluctuations are linked to behavioral performance and sensory learning, indicating that network fluctuations at rest are predictive of behavioral changes and neuroplasticity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number5270532
JournalNeural Plasticity
Volume2017
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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Touch
Neuronal Plasticity
Brain
Learning
Somatosensory Cortex
Hand
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Heba, S., Lenz, M., Kalisch, T., Höffken, O., Schweizer, L. M., Glaubitz, B., ... Schmidt-Wilcke, T. (2017). Regionally Specific Regulation of Sensorimotor Network Connectivity Following Tactile Improvement. Neural Plasticity, 2017, [5270532]. https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5270532

Regionally Specific Regulation of Sensorimotor Network Connectivity Following Tactile Improvement. / Heba, Stefanie; Lenz, Melanie; Kalisch, Tobias; Höffken, Oliver; Schweizer, Lauren M.; Glaubitz, Benjamin; Puts, Nicolaas; Tegenthoff, Martin; Dinse, Hubert R.; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias.

In: Neural Plasticity, Vol. 2017, 5270532, 01.01.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Heba, S, Lenz, M, Kalisch, T, Höffken, O, Schweizer, LM, Glaubitz, B, Puts, N, Tegenthoff, M, Dinse, HR & Schmidt-Wilcke, T 2017, 'Regionally Specific Regulation of Sensorimotor Network Connectivity Following Tactile Improvement', Neural Plasticity, vol. 2017, 5270532. https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5270532
Heba S, Lenz M, Kalisch T, Höffken O, Schweizer LM, Glaubitz B et al. Regionally Specific Regulation of Sensorimotor Network Connectivity Following Tactile Improvement. Neural Plasticity. 2017 Jan 1;2017. 5270532. https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5270532
Heba, Stefanie ; Lenz, Melanie ; Kalisch, Tobias ; Höffken, Oliver ; Schweizer, Lauren M. ; Glaubitz, Benjamin ; Puts, Nicolaas ; Tegenthoff, Martin ; Dinse, Hubert R. ; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias. / Regionally Specific Regulation of Sensorimotor Network Connectivity Following Tactile Improvement. In: Neural Plasticity. 2017 ; Vol. 2017.
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