Reduction of postoperative pain and narcotic use by transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation

Robert A. Solomon, Mary C. Viernstein, Donlin M. Long

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) was evaluated as a postoperative analgesic. Patients undergoing lumbar spine operations, hip surgery, and gynecological laparotomies were studied. Sterile electrodes, placed near the incision immediately after operation, were connected to a continuously operating stimulator for 48 hours after operation. Results from 46 experimental patients demonstrated that TENS could reduce the demand for postoperative narcotics in a group of patients who had not used narcotic analgesics before operation. No significant benefit was observed for patients who had used narcotics prior to operation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)142-146
Number of pages5
JournalSurgery
Volume87
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1980

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Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation
Narcotics
Postoperative Pain
Gynecologic Surgical Procedures
Laparotomy
Analgesics
Hip
Electrodes
Spine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Solomon, R. A., Viernstein, M. C., & Long, D. M. (1980). Reduction of postoperative pain and narcotic use by transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Surgery, 87(2), 142-146.

Reduction of postoperative pain and narcotic use by transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. / Solomon, Robert A.; Viernstein, Mary C.; Long, Donlin M.

In: Surgery, Vol. 87, No. 2, 1980, p. 142-146.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Solomon, RA, Viernstein, MC & Long, DM 1980, 'Reduction of postoperative pain and narcotic use by transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation', Surgery, vol. 87, no. 2, pp. 142-146.
Solomon, Robert A. ; Viernstein, Mary C. ; Long, Donlin M. / Reduction of postoperative pain and narcotic use by transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. In: Surgery. 1980 ; Vol. 87, No. 2. pp. 142-146.
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