Reduction in expression of the astrocyte glutamate transporter, GLT1, worsens functional and histological outcomes following traumatic spinal cord injury

Angelo C. Lepore, John O'donnell, Andrew S. Kim, Eun Ju Yang, Alisha Tuteja, Amanda Haidet-Phillips, Colin P. O'Banion, Nicholas J. Maragakis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The astrocyte glutamate transporter, GLT1, is responsible for the vast majority of glutamate uptake in the adult central nervous system (CNS), thereby regulating extracellular glutamate homeostasis and preventing excitotoxicity. Glutamate dysregulation plays a central role in outcome following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). To determine the role of GLT1 in secondary cell loss following SCI, mice heterozygous for the GLT1 astrocyte glutamate transporter (GLT1+/-) and wild-type mice received thoracic crush SCI. Compared with wild-type controls, GLT1+/- mice had an attenuated recovery in hindlimb motor function, increased lesion size, and decreased tissue sparing. GLT1+/- mice showed a decrease in intraspinal GLT1 protein and functional glutamate uptake compared with wild-type mice, accompanied by increased apoptosis and neuronal loss following crush injury. These results suggest that astrocyte GLT1 plays a role in limiting secondary cell death following SCI, and also show that compromise of key astrocyte functions has significant effects on outcome following traumatic CNS injury. These findings also suggest that increasing intraspinal GLT1 expression may represent a therapeutically relevant target for SCI treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1996-2005
Number of pages10
JournalGlia
Volume59
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2011

Keywords

  • Crush injury
  • Excitotoxicity
  • GLT1 mice
  • Glutamate uptake
  • Secondary injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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