Reduced left ventricular cavitary activity ("black hole sign") in thallium-201 SPECT perfusion images of anteroapical transmural myocardial infarction

A. Cahid Civelek, Irfan Shafique, Jeffrey A. Brinker, Krzysztof Durski, James L. Weiss, Jonathan M. Links, T. K. Natarajan, Mehmet A. Ozguven, Henry N. Wagner

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Abstract

Apparently reduced left ventricular (LV) cavitary thallium activity in both planar and tomographic perfusion images has been previously observed by these and other investigators. With single-photon emission computerized tomography, we have clinically noted that this "black hole sign" was associated with an aneurysm in the setting of a transmural anterior or anteroapical perfusion defect. We have now prospectively studied the etiology and predictive value of this sign in 84 consecutive patients with an anterior, anteroapical transmural perfusion defect. Of the 84 patients, 49 had both LV aneurysm (confirmed by contrast ventriculography, echocardiography or gated blood pool studies) and a black hole sign. Only 1 patient with an aneurysm did not have the black hole sign, and 2 without aneurysm did. Thus, it is concluded that this sign is highly accurate in diagnosing LV aneurysm. Because thallium-201 single-photon emission computerized tomography imaging is often performed as one of the first diagnostic tests soon after myocardial infarction, this has important clinical management implications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1132-1137
Number of pages6
JournalThe American journal of cardiology
Volume68
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 1991

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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