Reduced brain metabolism in hyperactive girls

Monique Ernst, Laura L. Liebenauer, A. Catherine King, Glinda A. Fitzgerald, Robert M. Cohen, Alan J. Zametkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: This study assesses the effect of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and gender on cerebral glucose metabolism (CMRglu), using positron emission tomography and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose. Method: Nineteen normal (6 females; 14.3 ± 1.3 years old) and 20 ADHD adolescents (5 females; 14.7 ± 1.6 years old) participated in the study. An auditory continuous performance task was used during the 30-minute uptake of,8F-fluorodeoxyglucose. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in global or regional CMRglu between ADHD (N= 20) and normal (N =19) adolescents. However, the global CMRglu in ADHD girls (N= 5) was 15.0% lower than in normal girls (N= 6) (p =.04), while global CMRglu in ADHD boys was not different than in normal boys. Furthermore, global CMRglu in ADHCTgirts-was 19.6% lower than in ADHD boys (p =.02) and was not different between normal girls and normal boys. Clinical rating scales did not differentiate ADHD girls from ADHD boys, nor normal girls from normal boys. Conclusions: The greater brain metabolism abnormalities in females than males strongly stress that more attention be given to the study of girls with ADHD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)858-868
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume33
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Brain
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Task Performance and Analysis
Positron-Emission Tomography
Glucose

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder
  • Gender
  • Glucose metabolism
  • Positron emission tomography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Ernst, M., Liebenauer, L. L., King, A. C., Fitzgerald, G. A., Cohen, R. M., & Zametkin, A. J. (1994). Reduced brain metabolism in hyperactive girls. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 33(6), 858-868.

Reduced brain metabolism in hyperactive girls. / Ernst, Monique; Liebenauer, Laura L.; King, A. Catherine; Fitzgerald, Glinda A.; Cohen, Robert M.; Zametkin, Alan J.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Vol. 33, No. 6, 1994, p. 858-868.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ernst, M, Liebenauer, LL, King, AC, Fitzgerald, GA, Cohen, RM & Zametkin, AJ 1994, 'Reduced brain metabolism in hyperactive girls', Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, vol. 33, no. 6, pp. 858-868.
Ernst M, Liebenauer LL, King AC, Fitzgerald GA, Cohen RM, Zametkin AJ. Reduced brain metabolism in hyperactive girls. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. 1994;33(6):858-868.
Ernst, Monique ; Liebenauer, Laura L. ; King, A. Catherine ; Fitzgerald, Glinda A. ; Cohen, Robert M. ; Zametkin, Alan J. / Reduced brain metabolism in hyperactive girls. In: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. 1994 ; Vol. 33, No. 6. pp. 858-868.
@article{94547bf12a9d4dbfba9294e268a43488,
title = "Reduced brain metabolism in hyperactive girls",
abstract = "Objective: This study assesses the effect of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and gender on cerebral glucose metabolism (CMRglu), using positron emission tomography and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose. Method: Nineteen normal (6 females; 14.3 ± 1.3 years old) and 20 ADHD adolescents (5 females; 14.7 ± 1.6 years old) participated in the study. An auditory continuous performance task was used during the 30-minute uptake of,8F-fluorodeoxyglucose. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in global or regional CMRglu between ADHD (N= 20) and normal (N =19) adolescents. However, the global CMRglu in ADHD girls (N= 5) was 15.0{\%} lower than in normal girls (N= 6) (p =.04), while global CMRglu in ADHD boys was not different than in normal boys. Furthermore, global CMRglu in ADHCTgirts-was 19.6{\%} lower than in ADHD boys (p =.02) and was not different between normal girls and normal boys. Clinical rating scales did not differentiate ADHD girls from ADHD boys, nor normal girls from normal boys. Conclusions: The greater brain metabolism abnormalities in females than males strongly stress that more attention be given to the study of girls with ADHD.",
keywords = "Adolescent, Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, Gender, Glucose metabolism, Positron emission tomography",
author = "Monique Ernst and Liebenauer, {Laura L.} and King, {A. Catherine} and Fitzgerald, {Glinda A.} and Cohen, {Robert M.} and Zametkin, {Alan J.}",
year = "1994",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "33",
pages = "858--868",
journal = "Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry",
issn = "0890-8567",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reduced brain metabolism in hyperactive girls

AU - Ernst, Monique

AU - Liebenauer, Laura L.

AU - King, A. Catherine

AU - Fitzgerald, Glinda A.

AU - Cohen, Robert M.

AU - Zametkin, Alan J.

PY - 1994

Y1 - 1994

N2 - Objective: This study assesses the effect of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and gender on cerebral glucose metabolism (CMRglu), using positron emission tomography and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose. Method: Nineteen normal (6 females; 14.3 ± 1.3 years old) and 20 ADHD adolescents (5 females; 14.7 ± 1.6 years old) participated in the study. An auditory continuous performance task was used during the 30-minute uptake of,8F-fluorodeoxyglucose. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in global or regional CMRglu between ADHD (N= 20) and normal (N =19) adolescents. However, the global CMRglu in ADHD girls (N= 5) was 15.0% lower than in normal girls (N= 6) (p =.04), while global CMRglu in ADHD boys was not different than in normal boys. Furthermore, global CMRglu in ADHCTgirts-was 19.6% lower than in ADHD boys (p =.02) and was not different between normal girls and normal boys. Clinical rating scales did not differentiate ADHD girls from ADHD boys, nor normal girls from normal boys. Conclusions: The greater brain metabolism abnormalities in females than males strongly stress that more attention be given to the study of girls with ADHD.

AB - Objective: This study assesses the effect of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and gender on cerebral glucose metabolism (CMRglu), using positron emission tomography and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose. Method: Nineteen normal (6 females; 14.3 ± 1.3 years old) and 20 ADHD adolescents (5 females; 14.7 ± 1.6 years old) participated in the study. An auditory continuous performance task was used during the 30-minute uptake of,8F-fluorodeoxyglucose. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in global or regional CMRglu between ADHD (N= 20) and normal (N =19) adolescents. However, the global CMRglu in ADHD girls (N= 5) was 15.0% lower than in normal girls (N= 6) (p =.04), while global CMRglu in ADHD boys was not different than in normal boys. Furthermore, global CMRglu in ADHCTgirts-was 19.6% lower than in ADHD boys (p =.02) and was not different between normal girls and normal boys. Clinical rating scales did not differentiate ADHD girls from ADHD boys, nor normal girls from normal boys. Conclusions: The greater brain metabolism abnormalities in females than males strongly stress that more attention be given to the study of girls with ADHD.

KW - Adolescent

KW - Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder

KW - Gender

KW - Glucose metabolism

KW - Positron emission tomography

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028226063&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028226063&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 8083143

AN - SCOPUS:0028226063

VL - 33

SP - 858

EP - 868

JO - Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

JF - Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

SN - 0890-8567

IS - 6

ER -