Red blood cell transfusion triggers in acute leukemia: A randomized pilot study

Amy Dezern, Katherine Williams, Marianna Zahurak, Wesley Hand, Robert Stephens, Karen Eileen King, Steven Mark Frank, Paul Michael Ness

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion thresholds have yet to be examined in large randomized trials in hematologic malignancies. This pilot study in acute leukemia uses a restrictive compared to a liberal transfusion strategy. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A randomized (2:1) study was conducted of restrictive (LOW) hemoglobin (Hb) trigger (7 g/dL) compared to higher (HIGH) Hb trigger (8 g/dL). The primary outcome was feasibility of conducting a larger trial. The four requirements for success required that more than 50% of the eligible patients could be consented, more than 75% of the patients randomized to the LOW arm tolerated the transfusion trigger, fewer than 15% of patients crossed over from the LOW arm to the HIGH arm, and no indication for the need to pause the study for safety concerns. Secondary outcomes included fatigue, bleeding, and RBCs and platelets transfused. RESULTS: Ninety patients were consented and randomly assigned to LOW to HIGH. The four criteria for the primary objective of feasibility were met. When the number of units transfused was compared, adjusting for baseline Hb, the LOW arm was transfused on average 8.0 (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.9-9.1) units/patient while the HIGH arm received 11.7 (95% CI, 10.1-13.2) units (p=0.0003). There was no significant difference in bleeding events or neutropenic fevers between study arms. CONCLUSION: This study establishes feasibility for trial of Hb thresholds in leukemia through demonstration of success in all primary outcome metrics and a favorable safety profile. This population requires further study to evaluate the equivalence of liberal and restrictive transfusion thresholds in this unique clinical setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalTransfusion
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Red blood cell transfusion triggers in acute leukemia: A randomized pilot study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this