Recurrent syncope episodes in a 33-year-old male patient: case report and review of literature.

Valentín Del Rio-Santiago, Sonia I. Vicenty-Rivera, Daniel Judge, Luis Ortiz-Muñoz

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Abstract

Case report and review of literature of a 33-year-old-male patient who was suffering from recurrent events of loss of consciousness (syncope) found to have multiple events of sustained and non sustained left bundle-branch morphology ventricular tachycardia during Holter evaluation. Both, the echocardiographic and magnetic resonance studies demonstrated morphological changes as seen in Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia (ARVD) is a rare cardiomyopathy characterized by life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias in the absence of apparent structural left heart disease, predominantly occurring within the male gender. Though it is mostly a hereditary condition, there are some sporadic cases. It is characterized by progressive degeneration and fibrous-fatty replacement of the right ventricular myocardium. The European Society of Cardiology and the International Society and Federation Task force is useful for the diagnosis of the condition because of the difficulties in as well as inaccuracies in tissue diagnosis. Patients with a diagnosis of ARVD who suffers from recurrent syncope events and ventricular arrhythmias an Implantable Cardiovertor-Defibrillator (ICD) is indicated to decrease their risk of sudden cardiac death events.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)89-98
Number of pages10
JournalBoletín de la Asociación Médica de Puerto Rico
Volume100
Issue number4
StatePublished - Oct 2008
Externally publishedYes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Del Rio-Santiago, V., Vicenty-Rivera, S. I., Judge, D., & Ortiz-Muñoz, L. (2008). Recurrent syncope episodes in a 33-year-old male patient: case report and review of literature. Boletín de la Asociación Médica de Puerto Rico, 100(4), 89-98.