Recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy after cervical Spine surgery: A multicenter aospine clinical research network study

Ziya L. Gokaslan, Mohamad Bydon, Rafael De La Garza-Ramos, Zachary A. Smith, Wellington K. Hsu, Sheeraz A. Qureshi, Samuel K. Cho, Evan O. Baird, Thomas E. Mroz, Michael Fehlings, Paul M. Arnold, K. Daniel Riew

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Study Design: Multicenter retrospective study. Objectives: To investigate the risk of symptomatic recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy (RLNP) following cervical spine surgery, to examine risk factors for its development, and to report its treatment and outcomes. Methods: A multicenter study from 21 high-volume surgical centers from the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network was performed. Each center screened for rare complications following cervical spine surgery, including RLNP. Patients were included if they underwent cervical spine surgery (levels from C2 to C7) between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2011. Data were analyzed with regard to complication treatment and outcome. Cases were compared to a control group from the AOSpine CSM and CSM-I studies. Results: Three centers reported 19 cases of RLNP from a cohort of 1345 patients. The reported incidence of RLNP ranged from 0.6% to 2.9% between these 3 centers. Fifteen patients (79%) in the RLNP group were approached from the left side. Ten patients (52.6%) required treatment for RLNP-6 required medical therapy (steroids), 1 interventional treatment (injection laryngoplasty), and 3 conservative therapy (speech therapy). When examining outcomes, 73.7% (14/19) of cases resolved completely, 15.8% (3/19) resolved with residual effects, and in 10.5% (2/19) of cases this could not be determined. Conclusions: In this multicenter study examining rare complications following cervical spine surgery, the risk of RLNP after cervical spine surgery ranged from 0.6% to 2.9% between centers. Though rare, it was found that 16% of patients may experience partial resolution with residual effects, and 74% resolve completely.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53S-57S
JournalGlobal Spine Journal
Volume7
Issue number1_suppl
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

Keywords

  • cervical spine
  • multicenter study
  • recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy
  • spine surgery
  • vocal cord paralysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy after cervical Spine surgery: A multicenter aospine clinical research network study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this