Rectal Douching Practices Associated with Anal Intercourse: Implications for the Development of a Behaviorally Congruent HIV-Prevention Rectal Microbicide Douche

Alex Carballo-Dieguez, Rebecca Giguere, Cody Lentz, Curtis Dolezal, Edward J. Fuchs, Craig W. Hendrix

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Tenofovir administration via rectal douching results in higher rectal-mucosa drug concentration than oral administration. Many who engage in receptive anal intercourse (RAI) use cleansing rectal douches. To inform development of a behaviorally-congruent tenofovir douche, 4751 individuals ≥ 18 years-old, born male, from all US states/territories, who engaged in anal intercourse responded to an online survey. Of those who reported RAI in the prior 3 months, 80% douched beforehand, 82% within 1 h, mean 2.9 consecutive applications; 27% douched afterwards, 83% within 1 h, mean 1.7 consecutive applications. Among multidose users, 78% applied doses within 2 min, and 76% retained liquid < 1 min. Most used tap water (89%) in an enema bottle (50%) or rubber bulb (43%), and douched for cleanliness (97%), to avoid smelling bad (65%), and to enhance pleasure (24%). 98% reported high likelihood of using an HIV-prevention douche. An ideal product will protect within a user’s typical number of applications, within 1 h, and be dissolvable in tap water.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1484-1493
Number of pages10
JournalAIDS and behavior
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 15 2019

Keywords

  • Enemas
  • HIV-prevention
  • Rectal douching
  • Rectal microbicides

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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