Reconsideration of the power�law (Batho) equation for inhomogeneity corrections

John W. Wong, R. Mark Henkelman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The power�law (Batho) equation for inhomogeneity corrections to the dose calculated in a layered medium has been examined to elucidate the implicit approximations made in its derivation and hence to discover its limitations. Relationships based on primary and first scatter dose calculations are established between the Batho correction and the true correction from which several conclusions can be drawn. For dose corrections within water in a two�layer medium, the Batho method underestimates the correction when the electron density (�) of the overlaying inhomogeneity relative to water is less than 1, and overestimates it when this density is greater than 1. The Batho method is excellent for small fields and �<1, but is poor for large fields and �>1. When the power�law equation is extended to multilayer media, by assuming that the correction factor for each layer multiplies independently, the method gives less accurate results. The largest errors occur inside an inhomogeneity directly underneath a top layer of unit density, since the contribution from such a layer is inherently ignored. All of these conclusions are demonstrated in the paper by experimental measurements. Finally, relationships are shown between the Batho correction and both the correction factor proposed by MacDonald et al. and the differential scatter air ratio correction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)521-530
Number of pages10
JournalMedical physics
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1982
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • ACCURACY
  • COBALT 60
  • CORRECTIONS
  • ELECTRON DENSITY
  • GAMMA DOSIMETRY
  • LAYERS
  • POWER SERIES
  • WATER
  • X−RAY DOSIMETRY

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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