Recognition and importance of forced exhalation on the measurement of intraabdominal pressure: A subgroup analysis from a prospective cohort study on the incidence of abdominal compartment syndrome in medical patients

Liang Hongyan Liang, Elizabeth Daugherty Biddison, Darren Taichman, John Hansen-Flaschen, Barry D. Fuchs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Intraabdominal pressure is measured conventionally at end-expiration; however, the significance of forced exhalation on this measurement has not been evaluated previously. Using data from a previous prospective cohort study of the incidence of intraabdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome in medical intensive care unit patients, the authors evaluated 65 strip-chart recordings obtained from 28 patients who had measurements of intraabdominal pressure and airway pressures taken simultaneously. Forced exhalation was identified by a rise in intraabdominal pressure during exhalation. Forced exhalation was observed in 4 patients; with a mean intraabdominal pressure increase of 14.3 ± 1.3 mm Hg at end-exhalation, compared with a decrease of -2.5 ± 1.2 mm Hg in 24 patients without forced exhalation and absolute pressures of 28.0 ± 6.6 versus 13.8 ± 3.9 mm Hg (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)268-274
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Intensive Care Medicine
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2008

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Intra-Abdominal Hypertension
Exhalation
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Pressure
Incidence
Intensive Care Units

Keywords

  • Abdominal compartment syndrome
  • Forced exhalation
  • Intraabdominal hypertension
  • Intraabdominal pressure
  • Measurement technique

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

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abstract = "Intraabdominal pressure is measured conventionally at end-expiration; however, the significance of forced exhalation on this measurement has not been evaluated previously. Using data from a previous prospective cohort study of the incidence of intraabdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome in medical intensive care unit patients, the authors evaluated 65 strip-chart recordings obtained from 28 patients who had measurements of intraabdominal pressure and airway pressures taken simultaneously. Forced exhalation was identified by a rise in intraabdominal pressure during exhalation. Forced exhalation was observed in 4 patients; with a mean intraabdominal pressure increase of 14.3 ± 1.3 mm Hg at end-exhalation, compared with a decrease of -2.5 ± 1.2 mm Hg in 24 patients without forced exhalation and absolute pressures of 28.0 ± 6.6 versus 13.8 ± 3.9 mm Hg (P",
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AU - Fuchs, Barry D.

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