Recent experience in health promotion at Johnson & Johnson: Lower health spending, strong return on investment

Rachel M. Henke, Ron Z. Goetzel, Janice McHugh, Fik Isaac

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies introduced its worksite health promotion program in 1979. The program evolved and is still in place after more than thirty years. We evaluated the program's effect on employees' health risks and health care costs for the period 2002-08. Measured against similar large companies, Johnson & Johnson experienced average annual growth in total medical spending that was 3.7 percentage points lower. Company employees benefited from meaningful reductions in rates of obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, tobacco use, physical inactivity, and poor nutrition. Average annual per employee savings were $565 in 2009 dollars, producing a return on investment equal to a range of $1.88-$3.92 saved for every dollar spent on the program. Because the vast majority of US adults participate in the workforce, positive effects from similar programs could lead to better health and to savings for the nation as a whole.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)490-499
Number of pages10
JournalHealth Affairs
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

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