Recent developments in HIV-related kidney disease

Michelle M. Estrella, Derek M. Fine, Mohamed G. Atta

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Although kidney disease has been a recognized complication of HIV infection since the beginning of the HIV epidemic, its epidemiology, underlying causes and treatment have evolved in developed countries where highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has been widely available. HIV-associated nephropathy and HIV immune complex-mediated kidney disease were the prominent renal diagnoses in the earlier period of the HIV epidemic. While HIV immune complex-mediated kidney disease remains a common finding among HIV-infected individuals with kidney disease, the incidence of HIV-associated nephropathy has been diminishing in developed countries. The role of the metabolic effects of long-term HAART exposure and nephrotoxicity of certain antiretroviral medications on the development and progression of chronic kidney disease is now of increasing concern. The long-term clinical implications of acute kidney injury among HIV-infected persons are increasingly recognized. Kidney disease in HIV-infected persons continues to be a major risk factor for morbidity and mortality in this patient population; therefore, early recognition and treatment of kidney disease are imperative in lessening the impact of kidney disease on the health of HIV-infected individuals. This review focuses on recent developments and ongoing challenges in the understanding, diagnosis and management of HIV-related kidney disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)589-603
Number of pages15
JournalHIV Therapy
Volume4
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2010

Keywords

  • HIV
  • HIVAN
  • glomerular filtration rate
  • kidney disease
  • serum creatinine
  • tenofovir

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Drug Discovery
  • Dermatology
  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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