Recent advances in small-animal cardiovascular imaging

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Because of the development of gene knockout and transgenic technologies, small animals, such as mice and rats, have become the most widely used animals for cardiovascular imaging studies. Imaging can provide a method to serially evaluate the effect of a particular genetic mutation or pharmacologic therapy (1). In addition, imaging can be used as a noninvasive screening tool for particular cardiovascular phenotypes. Outcome measures of therapeutic efficacy, such as ejection fraction, left ventricular mass, and ventricular volume, can be determined noninvasively as well. Furthermore, small-animal imaging can be used to develop and test new molecular imaging probes (2,3). However, the small size of the heart and rapid heart rate of murine models create special challenges for cardiovascular imaging. COPYRIGHT

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)667-670
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Nuclear Medicine
Volume50
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2009

Fingerprint

Molecular Probes
Gene Knockout Techniques
Molecular Imaging
Stroke Volume
Heart Rate
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Technology
Phenotype
Mutation
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Animal imaging
  • Cardiovascular
  • MI
  • Molecular imaging
  • Small animal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Recent advances in small-animal cardiovascular imaging. / Tsui, Benjamin; Kraitchman, Dara.

In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine, Vol. 50, No. 5, 01.05.2009, p. 667-670.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e03729b0a37c4407b172c776aa861f05,
title = "Recent advances in small-animal cardiovascular imaging",
abstract = "Because of the development of gene knockout and transgenic technologies, small animals, such as mice and rats, have become the most widely used animals for cardiovascular imaging studies. Imaging can provide a method to serially evaluate the effect of a particular genetic mutation or pharmacologic therapy (1). In addition, imaging can be used as a noninvasive screening tool for particular cardiovascular phenotypes. Outcome measures of therapeutic efficacy, such as ejection fraction, left ventricular mass, and ventricular volume, can be determined noninvasively as well. Furthermore, small-animal imaging can be used to develop and test new molecular imaging probes (2,3). However, the small size of the heart and rapid heart rate of murine models create special challenges for cardiovascular imaging. COPYRIGHT",
keywords = "Animal imaging, Cardiovascular, MI, Molecular imaging, Small animal",
author = "Benjamin Tsui and Dara Kraitchman",
year = "2009",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.2967/jnumed.108.058479",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "50",
pages = "667--670",
journal = "Journal of Nuclear Medicine",
issn = "0161-5505",
publisher = "Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Recent advances in small-animal cardiovascular imaging

AU - Tsui, Benjamin

AU - Kraitchman, Dara

PY - 2009/5/1

Y1 - 2009/5/1

N2 - Because of the development of gene knockout and transgenic technologies, small animals, such as mice and rats, have become the most widely used animals for cardiovascular imaging studies. Imaging can provide a method to serially evaluate the effect of a particular genetic mutation or pharmacologic therapy (1). In addition, imaging can be used as a noninvasive screening tool for particular cardiovascular phenotypes. Outcome measures of therapeutic efficacy, such as ejection fraction, left ventricular mass, and ventricular volume, can be determined noninvasively as well. Furthermore, small-animal imaging can be used to develop and test new molecular imaging probes (2,3). However, the small size of the heart and rapid heart rate of murine models create special challenges for cardiovascular imaging. COPYRIGHT

AB - Because of the development of gene knockout and transgenic technologies, small animals, such as mice and rats, have become the most widely used animals for cardiovascular imaging studies. Imaging can provide a method to serially evaluate the effect of a particular genetic mutation or pharmacologic therapy (1). In addition, imaging can be used as a noninvasive screening tool for particular cardiovascular phenotypes. Outcome measures of therapeutic efficacy, such as ejection fraction, left ventricular mass, and ventricular volume, can be determined noninvasively as well. Furthermore, small-animal imaging can be used to develop and test new molecular imaging probes (2,3). However, the small size of the heart and rapid heart rate of murine models create special challenges for cardiovascular imaging. COPYRIGHT

KW - Animal imaging

KW - Cardiovascular

KW - MI

KW - Molecular imaging

KW - Small animal

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=66149096696&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=66149096696&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2967/jnumed.108.058479

DO - 10.2967/jnumed.108.058479

M3 - Article

C2 - 19372476

AN - SCOPUS:66149096696

VL - 50

SP - 667

EP - 670

JO - Journal of Nuclear Medicine

JF - Journal of Nuclear Medicine

SN - 0161-5505

IS - 5

ER -