Rebound nystagmus: EOG analysis of a case with a floccular tumour

Atsumi Yamazaki, David Samuel Zee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Eye movements were recorded and quantitatively analysed in a patient with a tumour initially involving the cerebellar flocculus. Ocular motor abnormalities included (1) impaired smooth pursuit, (2) impaired cancellation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex when fixating an object rotating with the head, and (3) gaze paretic and rebound nystagmus. Comparable findings have been reported in monkeys with experimental floccular lesions. The rebound nystagmus (but not the other ocular motor abnormalities) disappeared when the tumour appeared to invade the brain stem in the region near the vestibular nuclei. This finding suggests that the floccular lesion unmasked a bias which created rebound nystagmus and that the bias probably arose in the vestibular nuclei.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)782-786
Number of pages5
JournalBritish Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume63
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 1979

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Pathologic Nystagmus
Electrooculography
Eye Abnormalities
Vestibular Nuclei
Smooth Pursuit
Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex
Neoplasms
Eye Movements
Brain Stem
Haplorhini
Head

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Rebound nystagmus : EOG analysis of a case with a floccular tumour. / Yamazaki, Atsumi; Zee, David Samuel.

In: British Journal of Ophthalmology, Vol. 63, No. 11, 1979, p. 782-786.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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