Real-time myoelectric decoding of individual finger movements for a virtual target task

Ryan J. Smith, David Huberdeau, Francesco Tenore, Nitish V. Thakor

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This study presents the development of a myoelectric decoding algorithm capable of continuous online decoding of finger movements with the intended eventual application for use in prostheses for transradial amputees. The effectiveness of the algorithm was evaluated through controlling a multi-fingered hand in a virtual environment. Two intact limbed adult subjects were able to use myoelectric signals collected from 8 bipolar electrodes to control four fingers in real-time to touch and maintain contact with targets appearing at various points in the flexion space of the hand. In these tasks, subjects achieved accuracies of 94% when target regions extended ± 11.5° about a target angle and 81% when the target region extended only ± 5.75° about the target angle. The real-time virtual system provides a practical and economic way to develop and train algorithms and amputee subjects using dexterous prostheses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
Subtitle of host publicationEngineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages2376-2379
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)9781424432967
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009
Event31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009 - Minneapolis, MN, United States
Duration: Sep 2 2009Sep 6 2009

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009

Other

Other31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityMinneapolis, MN
Period9/2/099/6/09

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Medicine(all)

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