Real-life experience of a brief arsenic trioxide-based consolidation chemotherapy in the management of acute promyelocytic leukemia: Favorable outcomes with limited anthracycline exposure and shorter consolidation therapy

Mindy Leech, Lawrence Morris, Moishe Stewart, B. Douglas Smith, Asad Bashey, Kent Holland, Scott Solomon, Xu Zhang, Hetty E. Carraway, Keith Pratz, Steven D. Gore, Amer M. Zeidan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Abstract Background Anthracyclines have activity against acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) but can cause cardiac toxicity and secondary malignancy. The all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-arsenic trioxide (ATO) combination is an effective noncytotoxic approach for APL. However, its efficacy against high-risk APL (white blood cell count > 10,000/μL) has not been documented. Also, it requires ≥ 8 months to complete therapy. Patients and Methods We report a retrospective analysis of 63 patients with APL given one cycle of ATO-based consolidation chemotherapy. Results The 5-year overall survival, event-free survival, and leukemia-free survival was 93% (95% confidence interval [CI], 82%-97%), 89% (95% CI, 77%-95%), and 92% (95% CI, 80%-97%), respectively. Conclusion These data have confirmed that an abbreviated ATO-based chemotherapy regimen is an effective consolidation therapy for APL, including high-risk APL, and can be completed within 4 months.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number520
Pages (from-to)292-297
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Lymphoma, Myeloma and Leukemia
Volume15
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015

Keywords

  • APL
  • ATO
  • All-trans retinoic acid
  • Anthracyclines
  • Promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid receptor α

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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