Reading level attenuates differences in neuropsychological test performance between African American and White elders

Jennifer J. Manly, Diane M. Jacobs, Pegah Touradji, Scott A. Small, Yaakov Stern

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The current study sought to determine if discrepancies in quality of education could explain differences in cognitive test scores between African American and White elders matched on years of education. A comprehensive neuropsychological battery was administered to a sample of African American and non-Hispanic White participants in an epidemiological study of normal aging and dementia in the Northern Manhattan community. All participants were diagnosed as nondemented by a neurologist, and had no history of Parkinson's disease, stroke, mental illness, or head injury. The Reading Recognition subtest from the Wide Range Achievement Test-Version 3 was used as an estimate of quality of education. A MANOVA revealed that African American elders obtained significantly lower scores than Whites on measures of word list learning and memory, figure memory, abstract reasoning, fluency, and visuospatial skill even though the groups were matched on years of education. However, after adjusting the scores for WRAT-3 reading score, the overall effect of race was greatly reduced and racial differences on all tests (except category fluency and a drawing measure) became nonsignificant. These findings suggest that years of education is an inadequate measure of the educational experience among multicultural elders, and that adjusting for quality of education may improve the specificity of certain neuropsychological measures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)341-348
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Neuropsychological Tests
African Americans
Reading
Education
Craniocerebral Trauma
Parkinson Disease
Dementia
Epidemiologic Studies
Research Design
Stroke
Learning

Keywords

  • Quality of education
  • Racial differences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Reading level attenuates differences in neuropsychological test performance between African American and White elders. / Manly, Jennifer J.; Jacobs, Diane M.; Touradji, Pegah; Small, Scott A.; Stern, Yaakov.

In: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, Vol. 8, No. 3, 2002, p. 341-348.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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