Reaction of hydrogen peroxide with ferrylhemoglobin: Superoxide production and heme degradation

Nagababu Enika, J. M. Rifkind

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The reaction of Fe(II) hemoglobin (Hb) but not Fe(III) hemoglobin (metHb) with hydrogen peroxide results in degradation of the heme moiety. The observation that heme degradation was inhibited by compounds, which react with ferrylHb such as sodium sulfide, and peroxidase substrates (ABTS and o-dianisidine), demonstrates that ferrylHb formation is required for heine degradation. A reaction involving hydrogen peroxide and ferrylHb was demonstrated by the finding that heme degradation was inihibited by the addition of catalase which removed hydrogen peroxide even after the maximal level of ferrylHb was reached. The reaction of hydrogen peroxide with ferrylHb to produce heme degradation products was shown by electron paramagnetic resonance to involve the one-electron oxidation of hydrogen peroxide to the oxygen free radical, superoxide. The inhibition by sodium sulfide of both superoxide production and the formation of fluorescent heme degradation products links superoxide production with heme degradation. The inability to produce heme degradation products by the reaction of metHb with hydrogen peroxide was explained by the fact that hydrogen peroxide reacting with oxoferrylHb undergoes a two-electron oxidation, producing oxygen instead of superoxide. This reaction does not produce heme degradation, but is responsible for the catalytic removal of hydrogen peroxide. The rapid consumption of hydrogen peroxide as a result of the metHb formed as an intermediate during the reaction of reduced hemoglobin with hydrogen peroxide was shown to limit the extent of heme degradation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)12503-12511
Number of pages9
JournalBiochemistry®
Volume39
Issue number40
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 10 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Heme
Superoxides
Hydrogen Peroxide
Degradation
Hemoglobins
Dianisidine
ferrylhemoglobin
Electrons
Oxygen
Oxidation
Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy
Catalase
Peroxidase
Free Radicals
Paramagnetic resonance
Reactive Oxygen Species
Substrates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Reaction of hydrogen peroxide with ferrylhemoglobin : Superoxide production and heme degradation. / Enika, Nagababu; Rifkind, J. M.

In: Biochemistry®, Vol. 39, No. 40, 10.10.2000, p. 12503-12511.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Enika, Nagababu ; Rifkind, J. M. / Reaction of hydrogen peroxide with ferrylhemoglobin : Superoxide production and heme degradation. In: Biochemistry®. 2000 ; Vol. 39, No. 40. pp. 12503-12511.
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